Posts Tagged ‘ photography ’

Angelspit and The Gothsicles with Man Woman Machine, The Fuze Box, Albany, NY.

I still have a lot more photos to add. Hopefully, the photos speak for themselves. This will be a hard bill to top for me.

First, Man Woman Machine is an electronic/Synth Pop band hailing from Rochester, NY and Massachusetts.

[all photos Robert B. Eaton/Rahb Eleven/Eleven Images, it’s not as though I make money for this, so just give me credit if you share these images anywhere else]

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Brian (The Gothsicles) has been coming back to Albany a lot these days. We couldn’t be more pleased to have him here in Albany. He’s coming back in an upcoming ExHuman event, appearing as his scaly alter-ego, DJ Fishdick.

From The Gothsicles set:

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This counts as the first time I’ve gotten to see Angelspit live. The set ranged through tracks spanning Angelspit’s discography, quite a few tracks off the latest release “The Product.” The set also included a track by Hardcore Pong, the side project of Karl (Zoog Von Rock/Angelspit) and Brian (The Gothsicles) with Brian joining Zoog and Matt (who did double duty with his hand-held midi-controller) onstage. Needless to say, the set did not disappoint.

Perhaps the best part of the night (for me personally) was the ten or so minutes I spent picking Karl’s brain about the stage clothes he custom-made for the tour. Super cool guy, and just massively creative, it was really cool to finally meet him after all the years following Angelspit’s career.

Anyway, this is the photos with (with camera 1) that I took. All the photos Aperture priority 1600 ISO, with flash. Edited in iPhoto.

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Near to the end of Angelspit’s set, my main camera’s battery went dead, and I shot the rest of the set with another camera. I will be including those photos, plus some crowd and behind the scenes nonsense, when I have a chance to update.

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Exhuman, Hive. May 1st, 2015 in Albany, NY at The Fuze Box

Photos from Exhuman’s recent event, Hive. Photos by Robert B. Eaton/Eleven Images, please attribute. Taken with Canon Powershot digital camera and edited in iPhoto. IMG_0140 IMG_0141 IMG_0142 IMG_0150 IMG_0151 IMG_0153 IMG_0154 IMG_0155 IMG_0156 IMG_0157 IMG_0158 IMG_0159 IMG_0160 IMG_0161 IMG_0162 IMG_0163 IMG_0164 IMG_0165 IMG_0166 IMG_0168 IMG_0169 IMG_0170 IMG_0172 IMG_0174 IMG_0175 IMG_0177 IMG_0179 IMG_0184 IMG_0185 IMG_0186 IMG_0187 IMG_0188 IMG_0191 IMG_0192 IMG_0193 IMG_0195 IMG_0196 IMG_0197 IMG_0198 IMG_0201 IMG_0203 IMG_0204 IMG_0205 IMG_0208 IMG_0210 IMG_0217 IMG_0219 IMG_0220 IMG_0221 IMG_0223 IMG_0224 IMG_0225 IMG_0228 IMG_0229 IMG_0230 IMG_0231 IMG_0234 IMG_0235 IMG_0236 IMG_0237 IMG_0238 IMG_0239 IMG_0240 IMG_0246 IMG_0247 IMG_0248 IMG_0250 IMG_0251 IMG_0255 IMG_0262 IMG_0264 IMG_0265 IMG_0276 IMG_0277 IMG_0280 IMG_0282 IMG_0284 IMG_0285 IMG_0286 IMG_0288 IMG_0289 IMG_0290 IMG_0291 IMG_0292 IMG_0293 IMG_0294 IMG_0295 IMG_0297 IMG_0298 IMG_0299 IMG_0301 IMG_0303 IMG_0304Exhuman occurs the First Friday of the month in Albany, NY, at The Fuze Box.

Photo Set: Rockland Psychiatric Center

Yesterday, I posted about my visit to The Living Museum at Rockland Psychiatric Center. It was an unexpected surprise when my OMH colleagues arrived at Rockland with enough time ahead of their meeting that we spent about twenty minutes driving through the sprawling campus. Rockland opened in 1931 –when it accepted 60 male patients– to ease overcrowding at Manhattan State Hospital. At it’s peak, Rockland may have had as many as 9,000 patients and 2,000 staff. (Asylum Projects website, aylumprojects.org).

Post-deinstitutionalization, Rockland seems to have been abandoned in stages. Closest to the road, many of the buildings are so overgrown as to be difficult to photograph through brush. Closer to the administration building (and the modern hospital complex) the buildings are abandoned, and derelict, but covered with ivy of vivid color –since it seems my trip to Rockland coincided with the areas peak time for fall foliage.
Since it is so expensive to knock down the large, old buildings, they are allowed to stand and decay. Closer to the administration building, however, it appears some some of the older campus is being re-purposed for out-patient, vocational and other therapeutic purposes. A walking path goes right through the abandoned parts of the campus. None of the buildings are fenced off from the rest of the campus –which still hosts a variety of patient services and hospital/rehabilitation services. When I had finished my meeting and tour with the director of the Living Museum, I spent about an hour walking the grounds and taking pictures.  Some of the photos were taken from the car as I first arrived.

[click on the photos to view them full sized]

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Currently, Rockland serves a patient (historically speaking) small population between various programs. They are some of the regions most severely ill. A large part of their current population is also deaf. Nonetheless, I felt quite welcome in the cafe and other patients areas. I chatted briefly with patients and peer mentors. One woman who I spoke to was deaf. I explained with a mix of gesture and spoken language (since many deaf can lip-read to an extent) that I was interested in the art and visting because of that. As it turned out, I later saw her working away in the Living Museum (art therapy studio at Rockland) doing a reproduction of an impressionist piece.

[I want to present a brief afterword: I hope in my presentation here, people find respect and sensitivity to my subject matter. Remember these are places where the mentally ill lived a part of their lives, where people worked. There are, I found after my return home, two cemeteries (one contemporary, and one older) on the grounds of the hospital.  May they all rest in peace.]

Lesson: Sketching From Cabinet Photos

Among my favorite subject matter for sketching over the past several years have been cabinet photos. Cabinet photos were a late 19th century print-making process. Photographers took the photos –generally in their shops and they were often used to advertise for the photographer. These photos satisfied the fascination of Victorian era people with access to an emerging technology –photography. The cabinet photo was extraordinarily popular until about the turn of the twentieth century. There are an abundance of them, and they can generally be bought for only a few dollars per photo.

For a couple of years now, I have been buying cabinet photos from The White Whale, an antique shop in Hudson, NY, each time I have vacationed there. The cabinet photos make for arresting portraiture studies to me for several reasons. First, photography was still expensive and most cameras were only in the hands of professional photographers. This means that most cabinet photos are of regular people, dressed in their best clothes, who must have traveled “into town,” to have their portrait taken. The cards I have bought are often of young women, dressed in probably what is their best dress. So, drawing ordinary people of modest means has a certain appeal.

The second consideration is more of a technical one. Photography was still a technology in its infancy. Long exposures and the process of print-making often did not produce as crisp an image as what we are used to today. In the image I am using, taken by photographer F. C. Flint, of Syracuse, NY, the skin-tones of the woman photographed are pretty uniformly the white of the paper, as are most of the woman’s intricate lace dress. There’s little to go on to draw the normal contours and shadows of the woman’s face, except for some shadow around the eyes and under the woman’s chin. For the way I tend to sketch portraiture, the lack of detail forces you to develop those details yourself, and intuitively. You have to learn to fill in the missing information with a good intuitive sense of anatomy and texture.

Cabinet photo by F.C. Flint, pencil on paper.

Cabinet photo by F.C. Flint, pencil on paper.

A second cabinet photo, this time the image is based on a photo from Farrand & Neale, 18th and 6th Ave, NYC.

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The face in the photo is placid. For whatever reason she seems anxious and terrified as I draw her. A reflection of my own state, perhaps. Nonetheless, thank you for viewing.

Also, below the woman’s face, her shoulders and chest begin to disappear in shadow. It’s a challenge to draw with a fair deal of detail from the image, and another challenge to replicate (in pencil) the vanishing light around the edges of the image in Victorian era photography.

Couple, cabinet photo, marked: Chamberlin, Norwich, NY.

Couple, cabinet photo, marked: Chamberlin, Norwich, NY.

This new drawing I found interesting to do, because of the elaborate clothing and the amount of detail in the photo. The image I am working from (the actual photo print) is very small, about 2 and 1/4″ by 4″. This particular photo is much smaller than most of the cabinet photos in my collection, although the others vary as well, in size and shape.

Since I am gearing up to do a portrait on commission, I broke out the pencils today (a new set, sent to me by my kind sister Jennifer) to practice my hand at sketching –something I will very likely be working on a lot in coming days. Again, from one of the cabinet photos my partner and I have collected, this one marked: “DeWitt”

He’s a relatively severe looking, aged gentleman, but I came to like him while I was drawing him and his substantial beard.

Drawing from cabinet photo, bearded gentleman, marked "DeWitt"

Drawing from cabinet photo, bearded gentleman, marked “DeWitt”

Cabinet photos can generally be found in antique shops locally, and can also be found online. They make a very interesting subject, in my mind for practicing portraiture.

Photo Dump: Exhuman, 11/1…

Some photos from “Something Wicked” Exhuman’s event at the Fuzebox, 11.1.13:

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