Posts Tagged ‘ art ’

New Works, Eleven Images 2017

Sorry, but I am getting caught up here. The older works (and some of these while the were still in progress) are here: https://elevenimages.wordpress.com/2016/01/06/eleven-images-new-work-2016/

As always, if you’d like to inquire about the pieces here (or any other pieces on the site not marked NFS, of course) simple e-mail me at eaton.robertb@gmail.com.

Meanwhile, here’s what I have been up to since the first of the year:

I am feeling very pastel today, began working on the two newest pieces. On the small easel, here:

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Untitled, oil and graphite on 2 x 11″ x 14″ canvas, first sitting.

 

Did some more work on both the oil paintings:

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Untitled work, oil and graphite on 2 x 12″ x 14″ canvas, second sitting.

And on the large easel:

 

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Untitled, oil and graphite on canvas, 24″ x 29″ first sitting.

Second sitting:

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Untitled work, oil and graphite on canvas 24″ x29″ second sitting.

 

I’m still working on the two previous pieces. Lately, I got a little side-tracked by something that interested me about doing the Sketching events. For those events, I have been working in mixed media (graphite, markers, paint, colored pencil). I started work on a mixed media piece on a roll of gessoed brown paper:

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Untitled work in mixed media on brown paper, 16″ x 30″, work in progress.

 

Back to working on the mixed-media piece:

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The mixed media piece on the floor, where I have been working on it.

 

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“Untiled (better image) mixed media on gessoed brown paper, third sitting.

On the small easel, color-blocking a smallish piece in oil:

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New work, color blocking, oil and graphite on canvas, 12″ x 14″

 

Spent a couple hours on developing the smaller of the two oils I am currently working on:

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“No Matter Where I Go, I keep Finding Myself Back Here” oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ second sitting.

 

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“No Matter Where I Go, I Keep Finding Myself Back Here” oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″, third sitting.

 

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“No Matter Where I Go, I keep Ending Up Back Here” oil and graphite on Canvas, 11″ x 14″ $145.

 

Started a new piece. For whatever reason, I wanted to orient this canvas diagonally to make a 10″ by 10″ diamond shape. Like so:

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Blank canvas, on easel.

I began by sketching an idea in graphite, and decide on a mix media piece, using graphite, marker, and acrylic paint.

This is the first sitting with that painting:

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The Hummingbird, mixed media on 10″ x 10″ canvas, first sitting.

 

Did a little work yesterday, working slowly and exacting to get what I want here:

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Hummingbird, mixed media piece (acrylic paint, graphite, pencil, marker on a 10″ x 10″ canvas, second sitting.

 

It finally came together in the third sitting, really happy with this now.

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“Hummingbird” mixed media on canvas, 10″ x 10″  $135 (sale pending)

 

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“Hummingbird” mixed media on canvas, 10″ x 10″  $135 (SALE pending)

 

Started working on two new pieces. Like the last one, this will also be joined by lengths of chain.

 

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Untitled, graphite and oil, 2 x 16″ x 20″ first sitting.

 

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Untitled, graphite and oil, 2 x 16″ x 20″ second sitting.

 

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Untitled (birb-something) oil and graphite on two 16″ x 20″ canvas, third sitting.

 

Worked for a little while on this one, it is getting much much closer to where I want it to be, but I will likely need another time or two at my canvas before I am ready to hang this one and let it dry.

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Untitled, graphite and oil on two 16″ x 20″ canvases, fourth sitting

 

Continuing to develop this piece, it is very close here, but I will likely continue working on it.

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Untitled, oil and graphite on 2 X 16″ 20″ canvas, fifth sitting.

 

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Untitled, oil and graphite on 2 x 16″ x 20″ panels, panel 1. (top)

 

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Untitled, oil and graphite on 2 x 16″ x 20″ panels, panel 2. (bottom)

 

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“Every Mourner’s Cry Echos” oil and graphite on canvas, 2 x 16″ x 20″ canvas affixed with hooks and chain (16″ x 44″ total dimensions), final, $480.

 

…and on the smaller easel:

 

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Untitled, graphite an oil on canvas, 11″ x 14″, first sitting.

 

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Untitled, graphite and oil, 11 x 14″,  second sitting.

 

Final

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“At a Red-light in a Warzone” oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ final $205

 

I needed to push out some quick canvases to hit some of those lower price points.  Tweaking this one, but it’s done. It just needs a coat of finish, once it’s dried overnight:

 

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“Dispatches from the Life-ruiner’s Society” graphite and acylic on canvas, 8″ x 10″ (draft)

And development:

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in progress

 

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Dispatches from the Life-ruiner’s Club, graphite and acylic on canvas 8″ x 10″ $45

Began color-blocking a new piece:

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Untitled, graphite and oil on canvas, color-blocking.

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Untitled, oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ first sitting.

 

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Untitled, oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ (second sitting)

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“Those that Keep Watch” oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ $235

 

 

A little more minimalist that what I generally do, but so far I like how this one has started, quite a lot.

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Untitled, oil and graphite on canvas 11″ x 14″, first sitting.

Second sitting:

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“It’s not that way, It’s over here” oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ second sitting.

To finish out this piece, my feeling was a couple of touches were needed, to balance the image with a cool-ish color, but very subtle so as not to change the over-all tonal palette of the image. I think I got what I was looking for with this piece.

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“It’s Not that Way it’s Over Here” Oil and graphite on canvas, 11″ x 14″ $145

 

 

 

New works in progress. It’s been a while since I have done anything very large. A lot of my recent work been with 12″ x 12″ canvases, and 8″ x 12″. I decided I need to scale up, and I put three 16″ x 20″ canvas together for a total dimension of 20″ x 48″. Did the color blocking, and I have begun to move into building up the paint.

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“Untitled” oil and graphite on 3 x 16″ x 20″ canvas panels, first sitting.

 

This has been a slow practice in building color, at first glance, it may look like little has changed since the first image, but several more hours of building color have now gone into this one:

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Untitled, oil and graphite on canvas, 3 x 16″ x 20″, third sitting.

Spent some time on this one:

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Untitled, 3 x 16″ x 20″, oil and graphite on canvas, up close details

 

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shot 2, up close, details

 

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Untitled, 3 x 16″ x 20″ oil and graphite on canvas full image, second sitting.

 

Third sitting:

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Anguish is the Only Language in Which I have Proficiency” Graphite and oil on 3 x 16″ x 20″ canvas, third sitting.

A better look:

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Panels 1, 2 and 3, respectively.

 

The piece is done, and drying, I will post more images of the triptych when it is dried and attached via chain and ready to hang:

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The Triptych, (“Anguish is the Only Language in Which I have Proficiency”) drying.

 

Triptych, fully assembled, “Anguish is the Only Language in Which I have Proficiency” oil and graphite on 3 x 16″ x 20″ panels. Hung with chain, full dimensions: 20″ x 62″.

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“Anguish is the only Language in Which I have Proficiency” oil and graphite on 3 x 16″ x 20″ panels, hung with chain (full dimensions 20″ x 62″), $650

 

 

This piece came together quickly, I will do a little cleaning the image up, but likely, it will be 90% done as of this image:

 

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“Aphasia (Blunt Force)” oil and graphite on canvas, 16″ x 20″ first sitting.

 

This piece may be done –I’m still deciding.

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Aphasia (blunt force) 16″ x 20″ oil and graphite on canvas second sitting.

 

Began color-blocking on a new piece:

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Untitled, oil and graphite on 2 12″ x 12″ canvas, color blocking.

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Untitled, first sitting, oil and graphite on 2 12″ x 12″ canvas.

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“She Has Constellations Within Her” oil and graphite on canvas on 2 x 12″ x 12″ canvas, second sitting.

 

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“She Has Constellations Within Her,” 2 x 12″ x 12″ oil and graphite on canvas, suspended with chain & hooks (final). $195, (on left), pictured here with its companion piece, “No One Got Left.” [sold].

 

New work, first sitting. A couple artist friends have suggested a very high-gloss varnish for this piece. As a result, I am probably going to clean up this image only slightly, –leaving the image mostly unchanged– and experiment with some varnishes. Stay tuned as I develop that process, I’ll be updating as this one is finished:

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“Don’t Let Your Light Go Out” graphite and oil on canvas, 8″ x 10″ (first sitting).

An artist friend recommended I finish this work with a very high gloss finish. Finishing the work took a bit of experimenting –but I think I have gotten most of what I wanted. This is a piece that really needs to be seen in person.

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“Don’t Let Your Light Go Out (in memory of John)” 8″ x 10″ $180

Working on new pieces this morning, this was the first sitting with this one.

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“In Cold Spirals”graphite and oil on canvas, 16″ x 20” color blocking.

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“In Cold Spirals” 16″ x 20″ graphite and oil on canvas.

 

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“In Cold Spirals” 16″ x 20″ oil and graphite on canvas, second sitting.

 

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“In Cold Spirals”(final) oil and graphite on canvas 16″ x 20” $165

 

Some of the first new pieces this year:

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“Not All Wolves,” graphite and oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″, second sitting.

 

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“Not All Wolves,” graphite and oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″  final. $85

 

This one is shaping up to be a recent personal favorite, it’s name however, remain elusive.

 

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Untitled, graphite and oil on canvas, 16″ x 20″ color blocking

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Untitled, graphite and oil on canvas, 16″ x 20 ” second sitting.

Nearing done, but I may still work on it some more. Right now it’s drying on my easel.

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“No One Who Wanders is Truly Alone”  16″ x 20″, graphite and oil on canvas, $180

 

…and on the second easel:

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Untitled, graphite and oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″, second sitting.

Still working on this one:

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Untitled, 10″ x 10″ graphite and oil on canvas, third sitting.

 

This one goes to the done-pile (tweaked a bit, but here):

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“Bedhead” graphite and oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″ $65.

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Cultivating the Sketching Habit: Figure V2.0

It’s been a little while since I have updated this particular page. The sketching events have been wonderful, and I have gotten some great images over the last several months.

Here is a small selection of some of the things that came off my easel. Enjoy!

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Figure Study, mixed media on paper, model Kyo

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Study, model Kyo, compressed charcoal.

 

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fFigure study, model, Kyo, mixed media on gessoed paper.

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Figure study, model Tabbi, mixed media on gessoed paper.

 

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Figure study, model, Tabbi, mixed media on paper.

 

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Figure study, model, Hayley, mixed media on paper.

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figure study, model, Hayley, mixed media on paper.

 

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figure study, model Muse, mixed media on gessoed paper.

 

All these studies are coming from the past couple months, I am hoping to find time to rummage through my port and add a few more to what is here.

 
Our new model Kyo did a great job tonight. He wants to see images of his modeling, so get them to him if you can:

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Adding the images from our previous session. We meet and sketch and drink again, this October 24th.

Enjoy.

 

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Study, female figure, graphite on paper. (The note, right is a reminder for me to recreate this image in a series of works done in wet gesso and acrylic paint)

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Study, back, male, graphite on paper

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Study, female figure, Prismacolor marker

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two studies, female figure with lap-harp, right, study of arm and clasped hands.

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Dancing, interactive pose, graphite on paper

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Back, female, graphite on paper

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interactive pose, graphite on paper

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graphite on paper

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Interactive pose, Casein paint, on paper

Thanks to everyone who attended, and special thanks to the models. Let me know if/how you would like your attribution to appear here). It was a great night for me and a great first night for the event.

Also, I came away with a lot of useful studies and sketches which might serve as jumping off points for other works down the line.

Enjoy the sketches, and keep reading below.

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figure studies, female and male, standing graphite on paper

 

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Female standing, male seated, figure study, graphite on paper

 

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Figure studies, female and male, standing, back view, graphite on paper

 

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Male, standing, study with figure aids (was explaining a concept to a class attendee) pencil on paper.

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Study, female figure, kneeling, graphite and casein paint on paper

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Male figure,seated, graphite and Casein paint

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Male figure, standing, graphite and Casein paint on paper

 

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Interactive pose, figure study, graphite and Casein paint on paper.

[continued below]

As many of my readers know, I am getting geared up to start a sketch and sip event at a local club. Since I am the host, it’s not like I can let my sketching game get slack. Nope. It’s time to get to work and pick up some graphite and brushes.

I booked a room at the Albany Barn, and scheduled a session with model, J, who is going to be one of our figure models for the event.

Before I scheduled the session, I talked with my model and I wanted to have a theme or an idea to build the session around so I might then have some images to work into a later piece. I decided on a post apocalyptic theme, and borrowed a Kukri (a type of machete) from a friend.

One of the things that is challenging at first, to learn about drawing figure is you simply do not have time to work in great detail. The key here is make each image a study of gesture, –the shapes you see in the body, light and the pose of the body. The images here are presented out of the order in which I did them. I began with a few short (5 minute) poses in graphite, the sketches done in Molotow acrylic paint markers were slightly longer poses (10 minutes) and the poses in which I used a mixture of graphite and Casein paint were 15-20munte poses.

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Pose 1, graphite on paper, model -J

 

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Pose 2, graphite on paper, model -J

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Pose 3, Molotow acrylic marker (sadly, the marker, which is metallic and reflective, does not show up well in photographs)

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Pose 4, graphite on paper

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Pose 5, graphite on paper.

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Pose 6, Molotow Acrylic paint marker

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Pose 8, graphite and Casein paint

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Pose 9, graphite and Casein paint.

 

En Plein Air (open air) Painting

While I am not primarily a water-colorist, (to me that was always my mother’s medium and she still owns the title family water-colorist) –I have begun to develop a lot of work in that medium. However, since the weather has been lovely as it has been, I have decided to do a series of watercolor paintings painted around Albany En plein air. Early in my teaching, I made an effore to develop proficiency in the medium. As I had to teach other people to use watercolor, I quickly taught myself and have greater comfort with it.`As the summer progresses I will probably do a lengthy series of watercolor.

Currently, I am intending to incorporate Eleven Images as a 501c (non-profit) in the very near term, and I also need a passport to begin traveling overseas. So, sales of this series will likely be used towards those purposes. I can ship these, and I accept paypal. though they would probably be most meaningful to someone with ties to the area.

Today, I was in Washington Park, on the west side of the lake there. The images are looking east over the lake. (all images watercolor on paper, 11″ x 14″)

I could sell these as a series (3, make offer), or $30 each.

 

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Sky, Washington Park

 

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Stones, Washington Park

 

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Lake and Trees, Washington Park

 

6/24/16: I returned to Washington Park today to paint a few more images. I think I will begin, next time, moving my easel around the city, and also, perhaps, into Troy and Schenectady. So if you happen to see me out and around, feel welcome to say hello and peek over my shoulder.

Enjoy

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“Washington Park Lake, Bridge” watercolor on paper 11″ x 14″

 

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Washington Park, flower beds, watercolor on paper, 11″ x 14″

Lesson: Sketching From Cabinet Photos

Among my favorite subject matter for sketching over the past several years have been cabinet photos. Cabinet photos were a late 19th century print-making process. Photographers took the photos –generally in their shops and they were often used to advertise for the photographer. These photos satisfied the fascination of Victorian era people with access to an emerging technology –photography. The cabinet photo was extraordinarily popular until about the turn of the twentieth century. There are an abundance of them, and they can generally be bought for only a few dollars per photo.

For a couple of years now, I have been buying cabinet photos from The White Whale, an antique shop in Hudson, NY, each time I have vacationed there. The cabinet photos make for arresting portraiture studies to me for several reasons. First, photography was still expensive and most cameras were only in the hands of professional photographers. This means that most cabinet photos are of regular people, dressed in their best clothes, who must have traveled “into town,” to have their portrait taken. The cards I have bought are often of young women, dressed in probably what is their best dress. So, drawing ordinary people of modest means has a certain appeal.

The second consideration is more of a technical one. Photography was still a technology in its infancy. Long exposures and the process of print-making often did not produce as crisp an image as what we are used to today. In the image I am using, taken by photographer F. C. Flint, of Syracuse, NY, the skin-tones of the woman photographed are pretty uniformly the white of the paper, as are most of the woman’s intricate lace dress. There’s little to go on to draw the normal contours and shadows of the woman’s face, except for some shadow around the eyes and under the woman’s chin. For the way I tend to sketch portraiture, the lack of detail forces you to develop those details yourself, and intuitively. You have to learn to fill in the missing information with a good intuitive sense of anatomy and texture.

Cabinet photo by F.C. Flint, pencil on paper.

Cabinet photo by F.C. Flint, pencil on paper.

A second cabinet photo, this time the image is based on a photo from Farrand & Neale, 18th and 6th Ave, NYC.

KODAK Digital Still Camera

The face in the photo is placid. For whatever reason she seems anxious and terrified as I draw her. A reflection of my own state, perhaps. Nonetheless, thank you for viewing.

Also, below the woman’s face, her shoulders and chest begin to disappear in shadow. It’s a challenge to draw with a fair deal of detail from the image, and another challenge to replicate (in pencil) the vanishing light around the edges of the image in Victorian era photography.

Couple, cabinet photo, marked: Chamberlin, Norwich, NY.

Couple, cabinet photo, marked: Chamberlin, Norwich, NY.

This new drawing I found interesting to do, because of the elaborate clothing and the amount of detail in the photo. The image I am working from (the actual photo print) is very small, about 2 and 1/4″ by 4″. This particular photo is much smaller than most of the cabinet photos in my collection, although the others vary as well, in size and shape.

Since I am gearing up to do a portrait on commission, I broke out the pencils today (a new set, sent to me by my kind sister Jennifer) to practice my hand at sketching –something I will very likely be working on a lot in coming days. Again, from one of the cabinet photos my partner and I have collected, this one marked: “DeWitt”

He’s a relatively severe looking, aged gentleman, but I came to like him while I was drawing him and his substantial beard.

Drawing from cabinet photo, bearded gentleman, marked "DeWitt"

Drawing from cabinet photo, bearded gentleman, marked “DeWitt”

Cabinet photos can generally be found in antique shops locally, and can also be found online. They make a very interesting subject, in my mind for practicing portraiture.

This Week (give or take) in the Class.

I’m going to try to break up the posts to progress every couple weeks. I’m still waiting to iron out the issues surrounding HIPPA (confidentiality) and showing student work (many students are doing fine work in the class). Until then, I will continue posting in class demonstrations. If you’re seeing this post the first time, my class is the blind leading the blind. I have struggled with a mental illness for decades. I’m celebrating my thirty-sixth birthday in a couple days. (August 14th) I am happy to be alive. I am happy to be teaching students in an inpatient psychiatric hospital that art can be a way to heal yourself, to grow personally, and to keep yourself well and out of hospitals.

The pictures are what I draw as I am teaching my students.


In the past week,(6/29-7/7) I’ve continued to focus on the use of color. Here are some more of the in-class demonstrations. I have based my lessons on a book I have borrowed from the library, “Understanding Color” by Marcia Moses. I’ve been using a couple of images by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch as out in-class examples, because Munch’s use of color is so striking of an example of the use of a limited palette.

Continuing the class discussion on color theory. I have been making art my whole life, and I’m picking up what I might of missed in my informal education, from what I take out at the library. My degree is not in art, so I am learning as my students learn.

We were doing split complimentary color schemes this week (complimentary pairs, pus an adjacent color on the color wheel).

My in-class demonstrations:

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Vincent Van Gogh, “Peach Tree in Bloom” reproduction. OIl pastel on paper.

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Color study. I gave my student the prompt: “Locals say, if you go you will still find her there waiting” Oil pastel on paper.

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Oil Pastel on paper, reproduction of one of my photographs, looking south from the Rennselaer train station.

Before our discussion of color, I did a simple exercise I feel is helpful for training the eye. I began the week by bringing in a bag of dried leaves from my yard. I had intended to encourage students to develop their eye for detail. This was an exercise I found useful, early on, as I was developing my own abilities:

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Leaf, charcoal on paper.

Shifting the discussion to color, I started with a simple geometric abstract, and encouraged students to use a limited palette in their own drawing.

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Abstract, oil pastel on paper. Students were encourage to use a limited palette. My example is dominated by the complimentary colors blue and orange, and green.

The next two examples are explorations/reproductions of Munch’s work. His general color palette and strong use of color worked well to illustrate aspects of color theory for my students.

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Oil Pastel on paper, Based on Edvard Munch’s “White Night.”

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Oil pastel on paper, based on Edvard Munch’s mural at the University at Aula, “The Sun.”

Over the past week, the class focused (mostly) on using perspective. In most of the classes over the past couple weeks I have also been teaching students to mix color and have been teaching the to work in water color.

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From pictures I took as an adolescent at the Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA. Water color on paper.

(Explanation of caption under the painted image: I wanted students to think of their lives before they were ill, and the kind of person they were –or might be, if they recovered from their mental illness. I had brought in photos I took of the Grand Canyon when I was an adolescent, before I was diagnosed and before I knew I had a mental illness. I had all the students caption their image with something about themselves. My caption reads “before I was ill, I was creative and adventurous.”)

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Barn, water color on paper. From the book “The Welsh Hills of Waukeska County” by Pat Byrne

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Charcoal and Water-color on paper, reproduction of Paul Klee’s “The Conquerer”.

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Tree-lined path/road. Based on a photo from the Welsh Hills (Byrne) again).

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Original image, water color on paper. Based on the house where I currently rent, Albany, NY. Perspective lesson

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Charcoal on paper, study/review of face and facial features. My students ask that I draw and older man.

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Perspective study, based on an image by Gustave Caillebotte, (“Paris, a Rainy Day”).

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Figure study, “Officer in Riot Gear” oil pastel and charcoal on paper.

Commissions Progress Page

There are few things that give me satisfaction like delivering a commissioned piece to a client or friend that requested the work. I have not updated this page so often as I should, unfortunately. I have been very fortunate to have done several commissioned works in the past year. Some are included here.

To set up a commission, simply e-mail me. I’ll give you a quote on the work, and I’ll begin work as soon as I receive your 25% deposit: eaton.robertb@gmail.com

Paypal is great. Shipping is available if you’re our of the area.

Another commissioned work, and this one I enjoyed so much. When people approach me about commissions, I am often really surprised in a happy way with the ideas people come up with. A friend, who is a practicing Zen Buddhist, wanted me to do an image in the style of Buddhist religious iconography, but using the Nintendo character, Kirby, as the central character in the image.

The final image:

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Kirby, as Buddhist Iconography, Casein Paint, Acrylic paint and graphite on a gessoed wood board. In private collection.

To prep for the final image, I did the following studies:

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Study, “the Buddha” Casein Paint on Gessoed paper.

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Kirby, study, acrylic paint on Gessoed paper.

 

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8-bit Kirby, study, acrylic paint on gessoed paper.

 

 

 

This work was a lot of fun to do. Aside that it was being purchased by a very good friend, it was a deeply personal work in many ways. Also, the client’s requests about the work meant I used painting techniques very different from how I usually paint. I definitely learned a thing or do, doing this particular work.

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Commissioned work, I am going to have to check with the buyer, because I forgot the title I scribbled on the back. Oil on Canvas, 18″ x 24″ in private collection

 

The next piece was also a joy to do. Sometimes, when I am approached about an idea the buyer has a very specific idea of what they want, –down to materials and the actual image. I do enjoy, though, when the direction for a commission is a little more amalgamous I have have the go-ahead to play and experiment with my typical style. This was one of those works. I had little direction other than to do something in my style, but include crows in the image.

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“Mother of Crows” acrylic on canvas, 16″ x 20″ NFS

On the SWPA page, I put out there I was doing commissions. A friend asked that I do one of the small works of Albany’s long-time alternative music hang-out, the Fuze Box.

The Fuze Box was a rescued Art Deco building and one-time White Tower Hamburgers location. White Tower was a Wisconsin-based competitor of White Castle, the first store opened and the company peaked in the 1950’s. Most of the original details in the building are still present: the molded glass and chrome, as well as signs advertising the buildings history before it was reused as a night-club. Long-time Albany scenesters still remember the days when the club was the QE2, and hosted live all-ages shows, as well as alternative dance nights.

So, a venerable historic structure in its own right, the Fuze Box/QE2 has been an anchor of Albany’s nightlife as long as pretty much anyone cares to recall. My friend, James, wanted an image to commemorate the Fuze Box and commissioned the work. I started doing preliminary sketches this morning.

A bit about my process: any commissioned work, or a serious work I do generally involves a few sketches. The sketching allows me to work out problems and practice the image before I start the actual work. I encourage my students to practice their ideas with sketches on paper before they truly start a piece. In this case, this is a mixed media color study and architectural study of the White Tower building (as it was in 2006, this image is from my own collection, taken with one of my many digital cameras I have owned over the years).

The sketch:

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The original image I am working from is below:

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I’ll include images, with the permission of the buyer, of the full work when it is done. If you’re interested in commissioning a work, use the contact information in the about page.

[update]

Working on an architectural drawing of a highly symmetrical Art Deco building is proving to be a challenge (not an unwelcome challenge, by any means, but still a challenge). Hopefully, I am not trying the patience of my buyer by taking my time and doing a score of preliminary sketches to get the end product right.

Last weekend, I went out with my point and shoot and took a couple night-time images to make a composite image for the final product. Today, I am working off pencil sketches of the various angles.

here’s today’s sketch (pencil on paper):

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I have permission from the buyer to include the work, which he just picked up today, on my blogs here. I did two versions of the Fuze Box image, and James, in turn, wanted both images.

So here they are drying on my easel (the source images I used are above):

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Thanks James, and I hope you enjoy the images!

Good friend and fellow odd human Seamus approached me about doing a painting for his girlfriend, Sid, who is likewise a super-cool human. What Seamus (being a Star Wars fan with a command of apocryphal and character lore I do not, sadly, have) wanted was a re-imagining of The Jabba the Hut scenes in Star Wars, with his cat, Sif, and he and his partner as characters in the piece. So, Jabba the Sif, became a thing. I drew four or five character studies, and then began painting what was one of the most fun images I have ever committed with acrylic paint to a canvas.

I have used the image with Sid’s permission.

Jabba the Sif. Acylic on canvas. Commission and birthday gift from Seamus to Sid.

Jabba the Sif. Acrylic on canvas. Commission and birthday gift from Seamus to Sid.

Thanks Seamus and Sid, I am glad you enjoy the finished piece.

Regardless of how quirky the idea, I am glad to take commisions of whatever you are looking for, and will do my best to fit materials and time within a budget you can afford. If you’re interested in a commission, use the contact in my about section on this blog.