Posts Tagged ‘ Albany NY ’

New Small Works, (Small Works Progress Administration) 2017

Sale! All Small Works currently marked down.

We’re already a couple weeks into the new year, I haven’t updated, but I have been busy.

I have started a new set of the Small Works Progress Administration (small paintings in acrylic and mixed media). That in the parenthesis there is something of a change in of itself: I discovered I really enjoy working in mixed media by doing a project for a friend. Previous series of small works had been in acrylic paint only, but this set includes acrylic paint, graphite, and marker, on gessoed cardboard. This new series will sell for $25 each. (dimensions are approximately 5″ x 9″, though these are hand-made items and their sizes vary)

[All works in The Small Works Progress Administration series are all currently on sale $20, or 2 for 30, –further discounts for sets]

The older small works can be seen here: http://wp.me/p2c9SR-bl

 

A couple new, enjoy:

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Bacteriophage, mixed media on cardboard, $25

 

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Combat boots, mixed media on cardboard, $25.

Putting newer stuff to the top now. I managed a few pieces this evening. I returned to images I have treated before in other places, some images come from cabinet photos, others are from my own 35mm photography of the area in which I live, and sometimes still life of random objects around my apartment:

 

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from cabinet photo, mixed media on cardboard $25

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still life of skull and small statuette, mixed media on cardboard $25

 

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Cabinet photo, mixed media on cardboard. $25

 

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Two versions of the same cabinet photo together, mixed media, $25.

 

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Entrance to St. Patrick’s Cathedral (Watervliet, N.Y. demolished) from on of my 35mm photos of the church. $25

Here are the first three of the new series, keep checking back as more will be going up soon.

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1868 Holy Bible, mixed media on gessoed cardboard

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Decorative Skull, mixed media on gessoed cardboard

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Polyhedron Die (D-20) mixed media on gessoed carboard $25

I have always been fascinated with skeleton keys. As an adult I have a small collection of them I buy in antique shops. Here are three studies of a couple keys I own, one is decorative, the other was bought at an antique shop.

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Skeleton Key (3 of 3) mixed media on gessoed cardboard. $25

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Skeleton Key (2 of 3) mixed media on gessoed cardboard $25

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Skeleton Key (1 of 3) mixed media on cardboard $25

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Skeleton Keys all three together on my easel. If someone wants to buy these as a set, I will sell them together at a discount.

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En Plein Air (open air) Painting

While I am not primarily a water-colorist, (to me that was always my mother’s medium and she still owns the title family water-colorist) –I have begun to develop a lot of work in that medium. However, since the weather has been lovely as it has been, I have decided to do a series of watercolor paintings painted around Albany En plein air. Early in my teaching, I made an effore to develop proficiency in the medium. As I had to teach other people to use watercolor, I quickly taught myself and have greater comfort with it.`As the summer progresses I will probably do a lengthy series of watercolor.

Currently, I am intending to incorporate Eleven Images as a 501c (non-profit) in the very near term, and I also need a passport to begin traveling overseas. So, sales of this series will likely be used towards those purposes. I can ship these, and I accept paypal. though they would probably be most meaningful to someone with ties to the area.

Today, I was in Washington Park, on the west side of the lake there. The images are looking east over the lake. (all images watercolor on paper, 11″ x 14″)

I could sell these as a series (3, make offer), or $30 each.

 

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Sky, Washington Park

 

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Stones, Washington Park

 

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Lake and Trees, Washington Park

 

6/24/16: I returned to Washington Park today to paint a few more images. I think I will begin, next time, moving my easel around the city, and also, perhaps, into Troy and Schenectady. So if you happen to see me out and around, feel welcome to say hello and peek over my shoulder.

Enjoy

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“Washington Park Lake, Bridge” watercolor on paper 11″ x 14″

 

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Washington Park, flower beds, watercolor on paper, 11″ x 14″

Eleven Images: Featured Pieces of the Week

On this page, each week I will spot-light a different work that is for sale and not currently on exhibit. I’m inundated with a glut of work in my two-bedroom apartment. With that in mind, I will feature different pieces here each week discounted from what I have asked when the works were on exhibit.

For inquiries, contact at eaton.robertb@gmail.com.

Had some pieces come off exhibit this week:  $35-$40 each. If you have your own frame, make an offer.

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Empire State Plaza, mixed media on paper, 8.5 x 11, $35, or make best offer.

 

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Study Cabinet Photo (Old Man), mixed media on gessoed paper, 11″ x 14″ $40, or make offer.

 

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Study, Alley in Troy NY, graphite and acrylic paint on gessoed paper, 11″ x 14″ $40 or make offer.

Featuring one of the larger pieces, –also– price drop.

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“A Maelstrom Will Love You In Its Time” oil on canvas, 24″ x 48″   was $345, –reduced to $300.

 

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“Hummingbird” mixed media on canvas, 14″ x 14″ $120

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“Horror-Skeksis,” acrylic paint on wood panel, 11″ x 16 and 1/2″, was $200, now $180

The exhibit “Impressive” at the Albany Barn has come down. Thank you everyone who came out to see my work and work by other great area artists featured in the show.

I have four of the wood-block prints, here. I would like to sell them as a set, but I will entertain offers for the individual pieces as well:

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“No One Who Wanders is Truly Alone”, woodblock prints (set of four) recently exhibited at the Albany Barn, $45 each.

 

This week, some work in mixed media on paper. First, some weeks ago I took a bus down to the river-front and did this study of “The Livingston Ave Train Trestle”

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“Livingston Ave Train Trestle, Albany, NY. mixed media on paper, 8 and 1/2″ x 11” $35.

and this:

from a 35mm photo, a study of the The Richardson-Olmstead Complex (former Buffalo State Psychiatric Center), viewed from the rear of the administrative building.

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The Richardson-Olmstead Complex, study, pencil on paper, 11″ x 14″ $30

And lastly, this:

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No One Who Wanders is Ever Truly Alone” oil on canvas, 16″ x 20″ (2016) $205

For those keeping track, This painting was the source imagery for the wood-block prints I did, that are currently being exhibited at the Albany Barn as part of their “Impressive” exhibit.

 

Some older features here:

 

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“In Cold Spirals” graphite and oil on canvas, 16″ x 24″ was $165, now $150

 

Lastly, I had a person interested in a photo, so I made two 8″ x 10″ copies, This is the second, framed, $30.

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Washington Park Lake, 8″ x 10″ print, Olympus OM-1 35mm camera. Framed, $35

 

Also, I am selling prints of my photo’s of St Patrick’s Cathedral (Watervliet, NY, now demolished):

 

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Saint Patrick’s Cathedral, (2011) Olympus OM-1 35mm camera. 4″ x 6″ print $30

 

Some new featured images for this week (2). Also, message me about the other (past) featured images. The first work –at its sale price– is part of a series of smaller inexpensive works in oil, titled “Uneasy Chair.”

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“Uneasy Chair,” oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″ $95

Also, in honor of today (4/24) being the day in 1990 that the Hubble Telescope launched on the space shuttle Discovery, this image (“In Cold Spirals”) was inspired by images of spiral galaxies which have become inspiring and familiar to those who follow the current era of space exploration:

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“In Cold Spirals” Oil on canvas, 16″ x 20″ $165.

 

This week’s featured piece is one I did for a themed show that was, sadly, not accepted for the show. The work is acrylic on two wood panels re-purposed from an abandoned table-top I commandeered. The image is based on a nineteenth-century headstone I photographed in Amherst, Massachusetts. The sale will include a print of that photo.

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19th-century Death’s Head Wings. Acrylic paint on gessoed wood. 2 wood panels 14″ x 35″ each. Make offer/inquire with artist.

Image of artist with the work:

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[Items below are on sale]

Brand new, finished up over the weekend:

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Aphasia (blunt-force) oil and graphite on canvas, 16″ x 20″ $90

Some older featured works, –now at reduced prices for the duration of the sale. “Body at Rest” I love his little guy so much, and I’d like him to have a home.

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Body at Rest, oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″ $175

“Mother of Crows”

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“Mother of Crows” acrylic paint on canvas, 16″ x 20″ $70

“No One who Wanders is Truly Alone”

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No One who Wanders is Truly Alone, oil on canvas, 16″ x 20″ $150

Also, “Uneasy Chair.”

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“Uneasy Chair” oil on canvas, 10″ x 10″ $95

 

Keep checking back as I’ll be featuring different recent pieces in this space. There’s a few more if you scroll downward that are also on sale.

 

 

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“Do Hearts Find Jagged Edges?” 16″ x 20,” oil on canvas, $125.

 

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“No Lover Isn’t a Noose in Time” oil on canvas, 12″ x 12″ $65

 

 

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“Lullaby for a Castaway” 8″ x 10″ oil on canvas $55

 

 

Please email inquiries or offers to eaton.robert@gmail.com (see the about section for details). As I said earlier, I have a whole lot of work that has recently come back to me. The following works were all included in The Art on Eight show. The show was put on by the New York State Office of Mental Health to spotlight the art work of artists who receive services through the Office of Mental Health. (Some of the previous show have been included in OMH’s Art on Eight Flickr gallery.

 

Several of the small works together that were recently in the show.

Several of the small works together that were recently in the show.

You can see more close up shots of the works as you scroll down (all these works are framed –you will probably wish to use another frame, it was a temporary solution for display purposes) These works are all $25, use the contact information in the about section of this blog: The following pieces are all approximately 8′ x 10″.

Fedralsburg, acrylic on cardboard

Fedralsburg, acrylic on cardboard [sold]

Study (Manet) The Old Musician, acrylic on Cardboard

Study (Manet) The Old Musician, acrylic on Cardboard

Figure Study, colored pencil on paper

Figure Study, colored pencil on paper

Trinity Church, acrylic on cardboard

Trinity Church, acrylic on cardboard

Young Mother and Child, acrylic on cardboard

Young Mother and Child, acrylic on cardboard

Dread locked Cow-girl, acrylic on cardboard

Dread locked Cow-girl, acrylic on cardboard

Figure Study, charcoal on paper.

Figure Study, charcoal on paper.

Quick Lesson, 5/14/14

So, this past week I stumbled upon a lesson idea I used in class. I thought I might share for people that teach students that may have limited or highly varied proficiency. Readers could also try this lesson on their own. Generally, I aim to create lesson ideas that challenge my students who came into my class with a set of fine art skills, but do not loose my students that may be thinking of themselves as artists for the first time. This lesson is intended for a group of adults with mixed skill levels. My students are adults hospitalized for a mental illness.

This lesson I drew inspiration from one of my favorite abstract artists, Paul Klee’s “Drawn One” (1935). See here:

 

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(Image from the website, friendsofart.net)

The simplicity of the drawing was possible to recreate for less advanced students. I encouraged my students who are advancing to draw a more realistic face.

Because I am working with adults with mental illness, I entitled the exercise “Fractured Self.” Many students used the exercise to explore their own emotional state at class time. I we were working, I talked about how the choice of colors, thickness of lines, and other things may influence the emotional content of a drawing.

I had students working in charcoal (the lines) and oil pastel. I also encouraged students to limit their color pallette to three or fewer colors.

The first step was  to have each student draw a grid of irregular lines that intersect. After creating the grid of lines, students who had been in my class for some time applied what they have been learning about drawing faces, and drew a bust (head and shoulders) in the grid of lines. The last step was to color in the segments of paper created by the grid.

My students responded well to the exercise. The assignment moved quickly, but is possible in a forty-five minute class. I am still working out with my employer the consent and privacy laws under HIPPA to be able to show any student work. Each class I find it helpful to demonstrate the activity on an easel in front of the room. So, I have included two images of my in-class demonstration.

I hope this may give you some of your own ideas. If you do try this in your own classroom, or on your own, I would love to hear feed back from people.

Sample 1

Sample 1

 

Sample 2

Sample 2

ExHuman, 12/6

More Photos from this month’s ExHuman:

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Mini-lesson: The Ten Minute Sketch

It wasn’t that long ago I was teaching in a classroom 40 hours a week in a subject matter that was unrelated to fine art. The simple reality for a lot of creative people is that a great deal of our days are spent doing things other than create art to pay our bills. So, with that in mind, the single greatest block on an artist’s creativity can be the simplest of stumbling blocks: “Do I have time for this?”

With this in mind I thought about ways that creative non-professionals and even professional artists can kick-start their process. I’m calling this example the “ten minute sketch.” It involves sectioning a piece of standard 8 x 11 1/2 sketch paper in your sketch book into four sections (the sections will be roughly the size of 4 x 6 note cards I was taught in high school to use to take notes for research papers).

Generally, I have encouraged my past students to “scale up” (ie: increase the size of their drawings and art) and to use a full sheet of paper for each piece. However, –this time around and in the interest of time– the idea is to create a smaller image that can be done more quickly as it will require less detail. Since this is meant for a sketch book exercise, it’s ideal for pencil or charcoal. Those who wish to may choose to work in color, but if you want to keep to the time limit (a suggestion, not a hard and fast rule by any means) you will simplify your drawing by working in one color, or with a limited palette.

Here is my example from last evening:

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My partner, Muse. Pencil on paper, 3” by 5”, from my sketch book.

Bare in mind, this is an exercise designed to help get the blood flowing. You need not agonize about small works not intended for sale. With the small size you will want to keep your details simplified.

I choose portraiture for the topic of this sketch. The planes of the face are generally simple enough to sketch in this small a size. Subjects that are more intricate and have a great deal of detail might take a great deal more time.

Whether or not you work in areas unrelated to your art, the most important key to being happy creatively is good time management. Set time aside each day to be creative. Whether your ten minute sketch is done in ten minutes or not is not important. The important piece of doing this exercise is getting over the notion of being “too busy” or, “not having time” to be creative. This is a mental trick more than anything else.

Get out there, have fun and create!

Cultivating the sketching habit (II)…

Some more recent sketches here. Many more are due because I am developing ideas for some of the small works I plan to do:

[explanation: I’ve recently become a lot more disciplined in doing regular sketches of images that I find interesting for whatever reason. When I was a kid, or a teenager, it was a natural thing to just pick up a sketch-book and treat whatever I saw. I sort of lost that habit in the business of being an adult. Now, as I am producing more lately, large complete works, it’s all the more detrimental to maintain regular practice sketching small ideas and things that I may want to turn into larger complete works.]

[note] I’ve decided to begin loading new works towards the top of the page, so it’s easier for readers to see new works, rather than scrolling past ones they may have already seen to see the newest pieces.

I am currently teaching an art therapy group three times a week, and looking for opportunities to do similar work elsewhere. Sharing my sketchbook in this way might seem a bit odd, since most artists tend to pretty jealously guard theirs. However, it’s become an important part of my pedagogy to encourage students to pay attention to their pre-drawing process. Many of these sketches are basic and rough ideas. Sketches are supposed to be where you problem-solve, they are supposed to be flawed and have problems. That’s the point. Ideas (should they make it to a final work and be hung in a gallery) do not arise fully-formed and perfect. They have a life before that. They start off malformed and imperfectly executed, –and many ideas wither on the vine and die. Being honest about that part of the process has become an important way to make creating art less intimidating for my students.

 

Some recent sketches:

7/9, I always encourage my students to pay attention to “pre-drawing.” In that spirit, this was a practice I did in the twenty minutes I was waiting for the class to start Thursday of the photograph of the train tracks looking south from the Rennselaer train station.

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Pencil on paper, train tracks, looking south from Rennselaer.

 

Two recent (from my sketchbook, 6.25.14):

First, an interior view from the cafeteria/common area in the psychiatric hospital that hosts my art class. I usually arrive at about 12:30 for a one o’clock class, and since I had no pressing business before the lesson started, I spent about 15 minutes doing this architectural study:

psychiatric hospital, sketch of interior/common area.

psychiatric hospital, sketch of interior/common area.

 

Today is one of the days I take my eight-year old son to the library. Normally, I goof around on the wi-fi, but today I opted to use the time to sketch instead. I needed a break from tech anyway. Two sketches of buildings around the Bach Library branch:

Residence, New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, USA.

Residence, New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, USA.

 

And this is the rear of two buildings I sketched from the patio area behind the library:

Rear of buildings, near New Scotland Ave., Albany, NY, USA

Rear of buildings, near New Scotland Ave., Albany, NY, USA

Adding two today (6.13.2014)

The first was a practice in my own sketchbook of a Van Gogh piece I was using to teach a lesson in perspective. It’s frequently helpful for me to sketch on my own and work out problems before I teach anyone what I’m doing:

sketch, done right before class, pencil on paper

sketch, done right before class, pencil on paper

Second image, I was feeling in a whimsical mood this morning, so I drew Edgar. Edgar is a diminutive, plastic foam Halloween decoration that has decorated my apartments for many years.

"Edgar," charcoal on paper.

“Edgar,” charcoal on paper.

 

Again, from the book “Hudson Valley Ruins” (it’s a beautiful book, the history in it and the images are top-notch.)

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An abandoned car, from the book Hudson Valley Ruins. (above)

 

 

 

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This should be a familiar sight to people who frequently travel from Albany to NYC: The Yonkers Power Station (abandoned).

In my current class, which is a “therapeutic” fine arts group held in a hospital, I drew this sketch to the prompt I gave my students, “And then the fire went out. No one noticed.”

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Quick architectural sketch. Image from the book “Hudson River Ruins” (Ranaldi, Yasanik [sp?]) The picture is of Fedralsberg, an abandoned ruin south of Albany:

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I have also been doing some figure studies:

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figure study, pencil on paper

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figure study charcoal on paper

Another in my series of images drawing Eduard Manet’s “The Old Musician

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A reproduction of G. Klimt

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And second, Timmy of Nixon’s Spirit:

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So, I am doing a lot of sketching as pre-planning for larger works:

These are the two pieces I posted yesterday I was interested in essentially “tinting” with watercolor:

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Study/sketch, pencil on paper. Pollock and Klingman together near the time of the artist’s death. Photo from a NYTimes article.

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Two small sketches: above is a figure study of a Libyan opposition fighter.

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Figure study, elderly woman with a rake. Pencil on paper.

The following two images I am planning to do further work with. I will do a similar thing as I did with another small work –an image of a depression-era man selling chestnuts from a vending cart. That piece I drew in pencil, and then tinted with watercolor. I am hoping to do that over the next couple days. I will post the results once I have an opportunity to do so.

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This is a reproduction/study of Edouard Manet’s “Madame Michel-Levy.” I am starting more and more to keep Manet as among my favorites of the Impressionists.

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This is an image of a TV/entertainment mogul. I found the image in the NYTimes. For whatever reason it made me think of the song lyric scribbled next to the image.

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The last image is of a young woman, Shawna Timmonds, who was profiled in a NY Times article.

More to come, soon…

These were both in-class demonstrations (charcoal on paper):

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(Note the lines and marks made as I illustrating planning and pre-drawing techniques)

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Hope to have some more of the recent sketches out of my sketch-book soon. Here’s one of my ideas from the SWPA series…

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Sketch for the SWPA.

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In class demonstration.

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In class demonstration: placement of facial features.

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Based on a photo from the New York Times.

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For class, sketching hands and feet.

A piece riffing off Edouard Manet’s  “The Old Musician,” it is a series I am considering for the SWPA (see for explanation here: https://elevenimages.wordpress.com/2013/10/24/the-small-works-progress-administration/)

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Here’s a couple more sketches (in color). This piece is pencil and colored pencil on paper. I was working with a student on using color in shadows:

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This piece is also a pretty good color study, this time in oil pastel:

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