Posts Tagged ‘ Albany ’

Cultivating the Sketching Habit: Figure V2.0

It’s been a little while since I have updated this particular page. The sketching events have been wonderful, and I have gotten some great images over the last several months.

Here is a small selection of some of the things that came off my easel. Enjoy!

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Figure Study, mixed media on paper, model Kyo

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Study, model Kyo, compressed charcoal.

 

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fFigure study, model, Kyo, mixed media on gessoed paper.

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Figure study, model Tabbi, mixed media on gessoed paper.

 

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Figure study, model, Tabbi, mixed media on paper.

 

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Figure study, model, Hayley, mixed media on paper.

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figure study, model, Hayley, mixed media on paper.

 

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figure study, model Muse, mixed media on gessoed paper.

 

All these studies are coming from the past couple months, I am hoping to find time to rummage through my port and add a few more to what is here.

 
Our new model Kyo did a great job tonight. He wants to see images of his modeling, so get them to him if you can:

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Adding the images from our previous session. We meet and sketch and drink again, this October 24th.

Enjoy.

 

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Study, female figure, graphite on paper. (The note, right is a reminder for me to recreate this image in a series of works done in wet gesso and acrylic paint)

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Study, back, male, graphite on paper

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Study, female figure, Prismacolor marker

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two studies, female figure with lap-harp, right, study of arm and clasped hands.

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Dancing, interactive pose, graphite on paper

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Back, female, graphite on paper

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interactive pose, graphite on paper

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graphite on paper

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Interactive pose, Casein paint, on paper

Thanks to everyone who attended, and special thanks to the models. Let me know if/how you would like your attribution to appear here). It was a great night for me and a great first night for the event.

Also, I came away with a lot of useful studies and sketches which might serve as jumping off points for other works down the line.

Enjoy the sketches, and keep reading below.

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figure studies, female and male, standing graphite on paper

 

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Female standing, male seated, figure study, graphite on paper

 

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Figure studies, female and male, standing, back view, graphite on paper

 

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Male, standing, study with figure aids (was explaining a concept to a class attendee) pencil on paper.

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Study, female figure, kneeling, graphite and casein paint on paper

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Male figure,seated, graphite and Casein paint

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Male figure, standing, graphite and Casein paint on paper

 

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Interactive pose, figure study, graphite and Casein paint on paper.

[continued below]

As many of my readers know, I am getting geared up to start a sketch and sip event at a local club. Since I am the host, it’s not like I can let my sketching game get slack. Nope. It’s time to get to work and pick up some graphite and brushes.

I booked a room at the Albany Barn, and scheduled a session with model, J, who is going to be one of our figure models for the event.

Before I scheduled the session, I talked with my model and I wanted to have a theme or an idea to build the session around so I might then have some images to work into a later piece. I decided on a post apocalyptic theme, and borrowed a Kukri (a type of machete) from a friend.

One of the things that is challenging at first, to learn about drawing figure is you simply do not have time to work in great detail. The key here is make each image a study of gesture, –the shapes you see in the body, light and the pose of the body. The images here are presented out of the order in which I did them. I began with a few short (5 minute) poses in graphite, the sketches done in Molotow acrylic paint markers were slightly longer poses (10 minutes) and the poses in which I used a mixture of graphite and Casein paint were 15-20munte poses.

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Pose 1, graphite on paper, model -J

 

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Pose 2, graphite on paper, model -J

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Pose 3, Molotow acrylic marker (sadly, the marker, which is metallic and reflective, does not show up well in photographs)

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Pose 4, graphite on paper

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Pose 5, graphite on paper.

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Pose 6, Molotow Acrylic paint marker

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Pose 8, graphite and Casein paint

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Pose 9, graphite and Casein paint.

 

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Angelspit and The Gothsicles with Man Woman Machine, The Fuze Box, Albany, NY.

I still have a lot more photos to add. Hopefully, the photos speak for themselves. This will be a hard bill to top for me.

First, Man Woman Machine is an electronic/Synth Pop band hailing from Rochester, NY and Massachusetts.

[all photos Robert B. Eaton/Rahb Eleven/Eleven Images, it’s not as though I make money for this, so just give me credit if you share these images anywhere else]

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Brian (The Gothsicles) has been coming back to Albany a lot these days. We couldn’t be more pleased to have him here in Albany. He’s coming back in an upcoming ExHuman event, appearing as his scaly alter-ego, DJ Fishdick.

From The Gothsicles set:

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This counts as the first time I’ve gotten to see Angelspit live. The set ranged through tracks spanning Angelspit’s discography, quite a few tracks off the latest release “The Product.” The set also included a track by Hardcore Pong, the side project of Karl (Zoog Von Rock/Angelspit) and Brian (The Gothsicles) with Brian joining Zoog and Matt (who did double duty with his hand-held midi-controller) onstage. Needless to say, the set did not disappoint.

Perhaps the best part of the night (for me personally) was the ten or so minutes I spent picking Karl’s brain about the stage clothes he custom-made for the tour. Super cool guy, and just massively creative, it was really cool to finally meet him after all the years following Angelspit’s career.

Anyway, this is the photos with (with camera 1) that I took. All the photos Aperture priority 1600 ISO, with flash. Edited in iPhoto.

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Near to the end of Angelspit’s set, my main camera’s battery went dead, and I shot the rest of the set with another camera. I will be including those photos, plus some crowd and behind the scenes nonsense, when I have a chance to update.

Exhuman, Hive. May 1st, 2015 in Albany, NY at The Fuze Box

Photos from Exhuman’s recent event, Hive. Photos by Robert B. Eaton/Eleven Images, please attribute. Taken with Canon Powershot digital camera and edited in iPhoto. IMG_0140 IMG_0141 IMG_0142 IMG_0150 IMG_0151 IMG_0153 IMG_0154 IMG_0155 IMG_0156 IMG_0157 IMG_0158 IMG_0159 IMG_0160 IMG_0161 IMG_0162 IMG_0163 IMG_0164 IMG_0165 IMG_0166 IMG_0168 IMG_0169 IMG_0170 IMG_0172 IMG_0174 IMG_0175 IMG_0177 IMG_0179 IMG_0184 IMG_0185 IMG_0186 IMG_0187 IMG_0188 IMG_0191 IMG_0192 IMG_0193 IMG_0195 IMG_0196 IMG_0197 IMG_0198 IMG_0201 IMG_0203 IMG_0204 IMG_0205 IMG_0208 IMG_0210 IMG_0217 IMG_0219 IMG_0220 IMG_0221 IMG_0223 IMG_0224 IMG_0225 IMG_0228 IMG_0229 IMG_0230 IMG_0231 IMG_0234 IMG_0235 IMG_0236 IMG_0237 IMG_0238 IMG_0239 IMG_0240 IMG_0246 IMG_0247 IMG_0248 IMG_0250 IMG_0251 IMG_0255 IMG_0262 IMG_0264 IMG_0265 IMG_0276 IMG_0277 IMG_0280 IMG_0282 IMG_0284 IMG_0285 IMG_0286 IMG_0288 IMG_0289 IMG_0290 IMG_0291 IMG_0292 IMG_0293 IMG_0294 IMG_0295 IMG_0297 IMG_0298 IMG_0299 IMG_0301 IMG_0303 IMG_0304Exhuman occurs the First Friday of the month in Albany, NY, at The Fuze Box.

Goings on With the Class: Visiting the Rockland Living Museum

First of all, many thanks to Julie at OMH for making this possible, by letting me hitch a ride. Secondly, thanks to Chris Randolph of the Rockland Living Museum for being so generous with her time.

KODAK Digital Still Camera

A sculpture made of found objects, it works as a wind chime. At the Rockland Living Museum

I didn’t teach my usual class today. I actually spent the day riding down to Rockland Psychiatric Center to view that hospital complex. Mostly, I am looking to see the Rockland Living Museum. The Living Museum at Creedmore has long been the act to follow in what I do. It’s my goal at CDPC to create a peer-run art therapy program that makes meaningful changes in the lives of the students in my classroom. Through a conversation with my contact for the Art on 8 gallery shows, I learned she makes frequent trips to Rockland Psychiatric Center. There’s a counterpart to Creedmore’s Living Museum there. So, at 8:30am this morning I was standing around the OMH Central Office on Holland Avenue, to catch a ride to Rockland Psychiatric Center.

My goal here was a simple one: to see what people at larger, long-running art therapy programs were doing and learn from that. Compared to CDPC which has a capacity of about 136 people in a single building, Rockland has a sprawling campus of buildings (many of which are abandoned). Post-deinstitutionalization, Rockland is a much smaller operation than when its reputation was much grimmer. I had heard about Rockland because of an innovative art program. A little searching around the web reveals the hospital was once considered a pretty bleak and hopeless place by many locals (its location is about 17 miles north of Manhattan). As I’m researching this blog about the history of Rockland, I quickly loose interest in the more salacious bits of its history. Grim suggestions of an overwrought staff and abused and neglected population dominates a lot of commentary from those who knew it or lived or worked there. I’m not looking for horror stories, not now, though I may read up on that later.

Lately, I am in the business of looking for answers to help even the sickest of Albany’s psychiatric patients recover and reintegrate into the community as much as possible. What I do, I do to get people well and empowering them to keep it that way. I have to believe people do recover and stay well, because I need to believe it for myself. Before I taught an art class at CDPC (as I remind the students in my classroom) I sat in the same chairs they are sitting in. Art therapies are a way to bring people out, and help them recover from severe and persistent mental illness. That’s what brings me to meet Chris Randolph today.

Chris Randolf is an art therapist. Her professional profile on a popular web site shows she once worked at a private facility in the same upstate New York county I was raised in, near a hospital where I was sometimes hospitalized, all in the city where I lived in a group home for 9 months. She’s the director of Rockland’s Living Museum, and over the phone she agrees to meet with me when I describe myself as the teacher of a peer-run art class. She does this a day before my arrival. She is even unfazed when my ride calls and asks her to meet me a couple hours ahead of when the Living Museum opens.

This serves as an outdoor sign for the Living Museum, part of a sculpture garden patients are rebuilding after it was damaged by a severe storm.

This serves as an outdoor sign for the Living Museum, part of a sculpture garden patients are rebuilding after it was damaged by a severe storm.

It’s far too warm for a day in October. I tend to be extraordinarily anxious in longer car rides. Mercifully, I get a stop at the rest stop mid-way. Lately especially, whenever I am in situations I can’t get up and move around I get stressed out. Nonetheless, since we arrive early, I am offered a breif tour of the whole facility before we park to sign in at the modern main building.

The main, modern building at Rockland, I find, reminds me in an unpleasant way of a building at Pilgrim State Hospital. This isn't the best picture to show that, but the similarity is there, and the psychological effect of the imposing building is the same.

The main, modern building at Rockland, I find, reminds me in an unpleasant way of a building at Pilgrim State Hospital. This isn’t the best picture to show that, but the similarity is there, and the psychological effect of the imposing building is the same.

Much of Rockland’s Campus is a series of ivy-covered, abandoned buildings. I am treated to the site of decaying structures bedecked in color, thanks to turning leaves. Here is one of those images, but I am intending most of that for another blog.

The buildings in the abandoned portions of Rockland's campus are still accessible. A walking path on the campus goes right along them.

The buildings in the abandoned portions of Rockland’s campus are still accessible. A walking path on the campus goes right along them.

My traveling companions sign in, and in a few minutes, Chris is on her way to pick me up to bring me across campus to Building 19, where the Living Museum anchors a large room of one side of the Recovery Center. We park in a small lot at the back, and Chris begins to show me the work that takes up her day from 1-4, when the Living Museum is open. She has the help of art therapy interns to work directly with the patients. Still, she seems to have a small anecdote for nearly every object outside. Aftr seeing the garden, we get into the actual studio in which the museum’s art is created, by residents of the hospital (many of whom are beginning to transition out of inpatient care).

The Living Museum has several areas which allow patients to work, and relax, listen to music or enjoy a cup of hot tea. Art by patients decorate the room throughout.

The Living Museum has several areas which allow patients to work, and relax, listen to music or enjoy a cup of hot tea. Art by patients decorates the room throughout.

The Rockland Living Museum was developed based on the pioneering Living Museum at Creedmore Hospital in Queens, NYC. The emphasis is on a peer-run program which uses art therapy to empower patients and assist recovery from mental illness. Under the direction of Dr. Janos Marton, a 2002 New York Times profile described the mission of the Living Museum as being a place of “refuge” where “over 800 men and women shed their identities as psychiatric patients and bloomed as artists.”

Patients simply come into the Living Museum space, and without lessons, or direction, they make art. That art has been widely exhibited. It is a series of paintings by patients at the Rockland Museum that piques my interest. At the Art on 8 exhibit (which I have my own work in, as do many of my CDPC students) a conversation about the work in the show from the Rockland Living Museum results in a plan for me to visit Rockland.

My own program is a nascent one. I have only just begun working in the hospital in April. I hear many complimentary statement from students. My class is something they look forward to all day and all week. I know I can make it more meaningful and powerful for my students. I know my story is compelling to them. I was sick on and off a long time. I got hospitalized, voluntarily or involuntarily, a lot. Now, I live in my own apartment and pay my bills. I haven’t needed a hospitalization in 4 years. I know it probably seems to my students that I know something they don’t. If there’s any truth to that at all, the thing I know is this: I need all of them as much as they need me.

That I am teaching again is important to me. Also, it matters that I am teaching people with whom I share a common struggle with chronic mental illness. Its my personal belief is that mentally ill people need to create a community of mutual support for each other. That’s why I do peer mentoring. I teach art because creating art has always been a large part of my own recovery and healing from mental illness. We as a community of psychiatric survivors, –we need to do it for ourselves.

Tables allow patients to work together, although some patents choose to work at stations around the room that are solitary. Great care seems to be taken to meet patient's needs and allow them to indulge their preferences.

Tables allow patients to work together, although some patents choose to work at stations around the room that are solitary. Great care seems to be taken to meet patient’s needs and allow them to indulge their preferences.

The underlying purpose of the Living Museum is to place art therapy, not as peripheral to people’s recovery, rather creative expression is vital to real and lasting recovery from mental illness. Art groups shouldn’t be in psychiatric hospitals to keep the mentally ill busy. The purpose of art therapy is to make people well. I believe this, of course, because it matches with my own experience. The historical connection between creativity and “madness” is long and widely studied. I’m a working visual artist, as well as a teacher. I know I do much better when I make creativity and expression my purpose.

Art adorns the whole room, and even the rafters. Many objects that become works of art are donated, including tables and chairs which are turned to objects of art. Chris states her goal is to get rid of all the furniture she feels is "institutional" in nature.

Art adorns the whole room, and even the rafters. Many objects that become works of art are donated, including tables and chairs which are turned to objects of art. Chris states her goal is to get rid of all the furniture she feels is “institutional” in nature.

After Chris picks me up at Rockland’s central building, I launch on a whirlwind tour of the Rockland Living Museum. We start with its garden. Chris explains that she has about a half-hour before some other responsibility she must attend to. In a short time I have seen a lot of things which inspire me, and leave me with a great number of ideas for my own work at CDPC. I also see the enormity of the task I’m trying to undertake.

Nearly every patient who takes part in the Living Museum contributes in some way to the beauty or the tending of this garden.

Nearly every patient who takes part in the Living Museum contributes in some way to the beauty or the tending of this garden.

The garden grows flowers, or herbs and vegetables intended for use in the food at the Big Rock Café. The cafe is a locus of food and conversation for many patients, and its walls also serve to exhibit work done by patients in the Living Museum.

In the Living Museum’s garden, some patients have taken plastic bottles and fashioned them as flowers decorated in vivid colors. Some patients have decorated the ground with painted stone tiles. Another has made small seats for rest or contemplation. Still others simply tend the garden and their contribution is watering the plants and weeding. It strikes me that Chris not only knows each person and their contribution to the garden, but she seems to have found a way to match each person to a way their skills and limitations still allow them to take a meaningful part.

For those of us in the peer/consumer movement, this is what’s known as a “strengths based approach.” The medical model of treatment focused on the deficits of a ill person. Medical professionals list symptoms, and address limitations. Throughout my time in the Rockland Living Museum, the focus remains on building and fostering the skills and abilities of people in treatment. Participants in the Living Museum direct their own projects. They choose their creative medium based on their already presents skills and interests. One man, Tommy, does most of the building in wood, a large section of the room is a dedicated space where he builds benches, chairs, stools and many other projects.

Tommy, who works in wood, has a dedicated space for his projects.

Tommy, who works in wood, has a dedicated space for his projects.

Most of the spaces for the museum’s artists are individual. The space is adapted to the artist and their interests and personalities. Some artists work is crafts or jewelry. The work is self directed, and flexible. Spaces have shelves of donated books, and a small radio for listening to music.

Other artist spaces include easels, shelves of books that are donated, even a handmade coat rack on which some artists have turned old canvases into lovely and unique purses.

Other artist spaces include easels, shelves of books that are donated, even a handmade coat rack on which some artists have turned old canvases into lovely and unique purses.

A lesson in resilience: a severe storm recently damaged an outdoor sculpture garden --composed mostly of driftwood. Patients are beginning to stack the wood, and rebuild the sculptures.

A lesson in resilience: a severe storm recently damaged an outdoor sculpture garden –composed mostly of driftwood. Patients are beginning to stack the wood, and rebuild the sculptures.

In the Living Museum, Chis leads me around from one project to another. Since the space is not yet open and no artists are present, she patiently answers all my questions about her work as director. She relates how the Living Museum started. At the beginning it was just her. Chris gives me many thoughtful recommendations for my own program. Much of the supplies, furniture and other projects are donated items, or carefully gleaned from sites like Craigslist and other free resources. The Living Museum is staffed, in part, by partnering with educational institutions nearby. But primarily, Chris stresses the need to create a program which eschews the traditional therapeutic model. Instead, she insists on a program which empowers patient autonomy and choice. This maxim underlies the program here.

This is of course, something I want for my own program. Changing a deeply entrenched institutional culture is a large task.

After I have seen the actual Living Museum itself, I briefly tour the larger Recovery Center –which constitutes the rest of Building 19. I see spaces that host group therapy, vocational training, computer access, music and performance space, and display space for some of the patient created wares from the Living Museum. I’m given an overview of the other programs. There is an all-day roster of groups available to patients (patients choose their own groups, and participate in creating new groups). I meet both hospital residents and peer mentors like myself. Chris eventually has a supervision to attend to, and I go to the café for lunch.

It’s in the café that The Recovery Center feels institutional to me for the first time. Though the food is fine, and the space is well decorated with the Living Museum’s art, several people mill about the cafe or in front of it in an idle and purposeless way. A couple of the cafés patrons approach me either wanting my coffee, or cigarettes. I talk to a couple of people there, and eventually leave to photograph the wooded, picturesque grounds. Much of the hospital’s campus is abandoned and overgrown. It makes a beautiful subject for my camera, since photographing abandoned buildings is a longstanding hobby of mine.

While I am walking the grounds, seeing all the wrecked former hospital buildings, it seems the hospital campus was abandoned in stages. Nearer the road, buildings are lost almost entirely in overgrowth, and as one gets closer to the center of campus and its modern buildings some of the older buildings are being returned to use. I am not sure, but it is likely that building 19 itself, where the Living Museum is housed, began the renaissance of the older buildings being renovated. It’s speculation on my part, but meaningful speculation.

That I was pestered for cigarettes, money, and coffee in the café reminds me that the needs of the mentally ill are great. People whose needs are being met aren’t listlessly sitting about looking for an opportunity to solicit something they don’t have or have enough of. Back at home, (my work at CDPC) there are a great number of people that need to be meaningfully engaged in addressing their own needs. Those needs may be educational, vocational, or –pertinently– creative expression.

There’s a lot of work to do.

.

New Small Works (late 2014-15)

                      [ALL SMALL WORKS CURRENTLY REDUCED, Inquire/make offer]

I decided to do another page of the Small Works Progress Administration. The other has a lot of work on it already and has fallen pretty far down the page as new posts have been added on the blog. These are all small studies I have done, on paper or cardboard, designed to be sold for $15 – $25. As an artist, I want people to think of original art as something that is available personally to them –not as something unaffordable that hangs in galleries or museums.

[…]

Adding a few of the images I created specifically for the Destroy Eleven show in Buffalo, NY. The first two images are of the center administrative building of the Richardson-Olmsted Complex, a former psychiatric hospital by a team of the 19th-century’s premier architects of large public buildings.

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Small works, “Richardson Complex 1″ approx 5″ x 9” acrylic on gessoed card-board $25

 

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Small Works, “Richardson Complex 2″ approx 5″ x 9”, acrylic on gessoed card-board.

The last new image is of one of my old film SLRs, my Canon Pellix 35mm camera.

 

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Canon Pellix 35mm Camera, approx 5″ x 9″, acrylic on gessoed card-board (sold)

Look for more, coming soon, I have a lot of ideas for these.

[…]

Added two more to the pile before running out of steam tonight. A study of a plastic skull, and a study of a gargoyle figurine I have in my house (sans tiara).

I am hoping to do a few more before the upcoming show, but I have stash available already. It’s an “if it happens” thing. But I will be selling these, and any more that get done tomorrow on Friday.

 

[…]

A couple more new:

“Rise,” approx 5″ x 9″, acrylic on gessoed cardboard (SOLD)

“If you’re not on a watch-list…” approx 5″ x 9″, acrylic on gessoed cardboard.

From Washington Park Flower Bed, approx 5

From Washington Park Flower Bed, approx 5″ x 9″ acrylic on gessoed cardboard

[…]

Gargoyle, study. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 7

Gargoyle, study. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 7″ x 9″ [SOLD]

“Skull candy,” study acrylic on gessoed cardboard approx 5″ x 9″

second image of

second image of “skull candy”

[…]

Completed a couple of the small works while I’m waiting for my son’s mother to bring him over for a visit today. For whatever reason, I choose to stick to some Albany landmarks. (Two images follow)

Dr. Suess tree, Washington Park, Albany NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 5

Dr. Suess tree, Washington Park, Albany NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 5″ x 9″ $25

Livingston Ave train Trestle, Albany, NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard approx 5

Livingston Ave train Trestle, Albany, NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard approx 5″ x 9″ [sold]

There will probably be  few more to come, later this evening.

Update, 6/7/15

Warming up to paint today by doing a series of random things, my partner’s roses and basil plant, and an old endangered church in Hudson, NY, which is a favorite photographic subject of mine:

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Rose (1 of 2) approx 5″ by 8″ acrylic on cardboard (sold)

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Rose (2 of 2) aprox 5″ by 8″, acrylic on cardboard (sold)

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Basil (2 of 2) approx 5″ by 8″ acrylic on cardboard (sold)

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Basil (1 of 2) 5″ x 8″ (approx) acrylic paint on gessoed cardboard $25

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Presbyterian Church, Hudson, NY 5″ x 8″ approx, acrylic on gessoed cardboard

[…}

Update, 3/7/15

The first Edgar has already sold, but even before that happened, I had intended to do a series of Edgars. For those who don’t know me personally, Edgar is a foam-rubber Halloween decoration that has been prominently displayed in all my various apartments over many years. In this work, Edgar is re-imagined as the subject of propaganda art. Calling this “Wait for Your Glorious Future (Edgar II).”

“Wait for Your Glorious Future (Edgar II)” Acrylic on gessoed cardboard. $25

[…]

Today (13, October) wasn’t the most productive day at the easel, but at least I got myself working today. I started one larger piece (that I’m not ready to show progress on yet) and I did another small work for the Small Works Progress Administration.

This is just a simple image of a flower that came out of a bag of mixed seeds I got free with an online order.

If anybody is good at identifying flowers, let me know. I’m terribly bad at it these days (though I wasn’t always).

KODAK Digital Still Camera

Unidentified Flower, acrylic on cardboard, SOLD

[return to older post]

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Edgar 1, acrylic on card-board. 4″ x 7 1/2″ SOLD

I did one of the Edgars today (I will probably do several more, especially if people express interest. Plus, I find painting them fun and whimsical) If you don’t know Edgar’s story, I explain in the sketches blog (II).

Secondly, I did a very small image of a single wine glass:

Wine glass, 3

Wine glass, 3″x5″, acrylic on gessoed card board -SOLD-

Lastly, there’s an image of “The Peak House,” a (now demolished) farmhouse in Saratoga County that was near the home I grew up in. The image is based on a picture I took with a Pentax 35mm SLR I learned photography on as a teenager.

The Peak House, acrylic on card board, 5

The Peak House, acrylic on card board, 4″ x 8″ $20

[older]

The pieces shown here were done yesterday. While visiting with my son, I set up my easel near the park playground (Washington Park, in Albany, NY, where he usually plays). There are little color-studies of some of the stately old trees there, and a few subjects a little more whimsical.

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Washington Park tree, water color on paper. 7 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ approximate.$15

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Washington Park tree # 2, watercolor on paper. 7 1/2″ by 9 1/2″ approximate. $15

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Pencil on paper sketch of an espresso (demitasse) cup. From my sketch book. (make offer)

To see my original post about the NWPA, go here: https://elevenimages.wordpress.com/2013/10/24/the-small-works-progress-administration/

A couple more whimsical images:

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Child on bicycle, watercolor and pencil on paper, 8 1/2″ by 11″. $15

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“RAWR!” (children’s playground equipment) Washington Park, Albany NY. Watercolor on paper, 7 1/2″ by 9″ approximate. $15

If you are interested in any of the works shown there, or in any of the images following, please use the e-mail listed by clicking “about Eleven Images.”

The Class

For those that didn’t know, I have spent the last several weeks teaching an art class within the Capital District Psychiatric Center. My goal is to get funding to expand a program that makes fine art classes a part of mental health treatment both inside and outside the hospital in the city I live in: Albany, NY.

Again for those who didn’t know: this is a goal for me, because I know when I was inpatient in CDPC, art groups were important to me as a way to rebuild my life in the hard times I was having. The art groups were something I looked forward to each day when I was inpatient. As  teacher, I want to use art to help troubled people do what I did: get out of the hospital and live better lives outside of the mental health system. Mentally ill people can live full lives, hold jobs, and stay well. We can and do recover. I feel like art can help mentally ill people do that, and I am not alone in that belief.

In that spirit, I’d like to show some of the in-class demonstrations I have done. These are sketches and things I did during the class, demonstrating for my students, art techniques and skills.

It’s my hope that my students not only develop their own skill, but find ways to make art a part of thier lives once they are back living in the community –professionally, or non-professionally.

Art is important. I know from looking around my classroom, art is important to helping struggling people heal.

Some images:

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Bulletin board of my student’s work

 

[update] 5/21

This past week the class has been working with mannikins (croquis) I was able to purchase with the grant money I received. The class has really latched on to drawing with croquis. This past week, I have been encourage students to pose the croquis and talk about an incident in their lives. The class has a two-fold purpose of not only teaching art, but as an informal part of the students therapy and recover from significant mental illness (all students are currently admitted on an in-patient basis). There are two images from this (my in-class demonstrations):

croquis/figure study charcoal sketch on paper

croquis/figure study charcoal sketch on paper

 

The first sketch: a student described a family member who had overcome addiction.

 

Croquis/figure study charcoal on paper

Croquis/figure study charcoal on paper

 

The pose is meant to describe a student’s experience during a recent depressive episode.

 

[update]

Adding some new works, older sketches and works are towards the bottom of the post.

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Acrylic on paper, student prompt was to represent what “trouble” meant to them, based on a podcast from “This Modern Life”. Related to a San Francisco cafe whose proprietor struggles with Schizo-effective disorder.

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Fayette Michigan, abandoned town and now a historical site. Watercolor on paper.

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Lake Michigan, near Escanaba, Michigan. Watercolor on paper.

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Sketch, charcoal on paper. Portraits.

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Oil Pastel on paper. Prompt for this was encouraging students to depict “Safe Spaces”

[…]

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Sketching architecture, reproduction of Van Gogh’s House at Arles.

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Architectural study, perspective example. In this case a very quick study of the corner of Clinton and N. Pearl St. In-class example.

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Study, landscape, another Van Gogh reproduction.

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Study of Paul Klee’s “The Red Balloon,” from a lesson on using color and abstraction/ non-representational drawing.

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Architectural study, from the book “Hudson Valley Ruins.”

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Portrait, study. From a lesson about composition and placement of facial features.

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Studies: faces and facial features.

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Study, portraiture, faces and facial features.

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Placement of facial features and composition.

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Manet’s work “The Old Musician” has been a recurrent theme in my sketching. In this case, the “dread-locked cow-girl” is based off a figure in the Manet piece, and swaps the gender of a figure from Manet’s work.

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Study, dog

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Study, infant.

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Study, tree trunk.

First, a figure study. Study of a child playing, including an illustrated armature (left). In class demonstration.

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Reproduction, Paul Cezanne. Working on landscapes, explanation of horizon line. Oil pastel on paper.

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Photo Dump: Exhuman, 11/1…

Some photos from “Something Wicked” Exhuman’s event at the Fuzebox, 11.1.13:

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