Archive for the ‘ sketches ’ Category

New Small Works (late 2014-15)

                      [ALL SMALL WORKS CURRENTLY REDUCED, Inquire/make offer]

I decided to do another page of the Small Works Progress Administration. The other has a lot of work on it already and has fallen pretty far down the page as new posts have been added on the blog. These are all small studies I have done, on paper or cardboard, designed to be sold for $15 – $25. As an artist, I want people to think of original art as something that is available personally to them –not as something unaffordable that hangs in galleries or museums.

[…]

Adding a few of the images I created specifically for the Destroy Eleven show in Buffalo, NY. The first two images are of the center administrative building of the Richardson-Olmsted Complex, a former psychiatric hospital by a team of the 19th-century’s premier architects of large public buildings.

IMG_1763

Small works, “Richardson Complex 1″ approx 5″ x 9” acrylic on gessoed card-board $25

 

IMG_1766

Small Works, “Richardson Complex 2″ approx 5″ x 9”, acrylic on gessoed card-board.

The last new image is of one of my old film SLRs, my Canon Pellix 35mm camera.

 

IMG_1765

Canon Pellix 35mm Camera, approx 5″ x 9″, acrylic on gessoed card-board (sold)

Look for more, coming soon, I have a lot of ideas for these.

[…]

Added two more to the pile before running out of steam tonight. A study of a plastic skull, and a study of a gargoyle figurine I have in my house (sans tiara).

I am hoping to do a few more before the upcoming show, but I have stash available already. It’s an “if it happens” thing. But I will be selling these, and any more that get done tomorrow on Friday.

 

[…]

A couple more new:

“Rise,” approx 5″ x 9″, acrylic on gessoed cardboard (SOLD)

“If you’re not on a watch-list…” approx 5″ x 9″, acrylic on gessoed cardboard.

From Washington Park Flower Bed, approx 5

From Washington Park Flower Bed, approx 5″ x 9″ acrylic on gessoed cardboard

[…]

Gargoyle, study. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 7

Gargoyle, study. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 7″ x 9″ [SOLD]

“Skull candy,” study acrylic on gessoed cardboard approx 5″ x 9″

second image of

second image of “skull candy”

[…]

Completed a couple of the small works while I’m waiting for my son’s mother to bring him over for a visit today. For whatever reason, I choose to stick to some Albany landmarks. (Two images follow)

Dr. Suess tree, Washington Park, Albany NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 5

Dr. Suess tree, Washington Park, Albany NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard, approx 5″ x 9″ $25

Livingston Ave train Trestle, Albany, NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard approx 5

Livingston Ave train Trestle, Albany, NY. Acrylic on gessoed cardboard approx 5″ x 9″ [sold]

There will probably be  few more to come, later this evening.

Update, 6/7/15

Warming up to paint today by doing a series of random things, my partner’s roses and basil plant, and an old endangered church in Hudson, NY, which is a favorite photographic subject of mine:

IMG_0770

Rose (1 of 2) approx 5″ by 8″ acrylic on cardboard (sold)

IMG_0771

Rose (2 of 2) aprox 5″ by 8″, acrylic on cardboard (sold)

IMG_0772

Basil (2 of 2) approx 5″ by 8″ acrylic on cardboard (sold)

IMG_0773

Basil (1 of 2) 5″ x 8″ (approx) acrylic paint on gessoed cardboard $25

IMG_0774

Presbyterian Church, Hudson, NY 5″ x 8″ approx, acrylic on gessoed cardboard

[…}

Update, 3/7/15

The first Edgar has already sold, but even before that happened, I had intended to do a series of Edgars. For those who don’t know me personally, Edgar is a foam-rubber Halloween decoration that has been prominently displayed in all my various apartments over many years. In this work, Edgar is re-imagined as the subject of propaganda art. Calling this “Wait for Your Glorious Future (Edgar II).”

“Wait for Your Glorious Future (Edgar II)” Acrylic on gessoed cardboard. $25

[…]

Today (13, October) wasn’t the most productive day at the easel, but at least I got myself working today. I started one larger piece (that I’m not ready to show progress on yet) and I did another small work for the Small Works Progress Administration.

This is just a simple image of a flower that came out of a bag of mixed seeds I got free with an online order.

If anybody is good at identifying flowers, let me know. I’m terribly bad at it these days (though I wasn’t always).

KODAK Digital Still Camera

Unidentified Flower, acrylic on cardboard, SOLD

[return to older post]

111_4681

Edgar 1, acrylic on card-board. 4″ x 7 1/2″ SOLD

I did one of the Edgars today (I will probably do several more, especially if people express interest. Plus, I find painting them fun and whimsical) If you don’t know Edgar’s story, I explain in the sketches blog (II).

Secondly, I did a very small image of a single wine glass:

Wine glass, 3

Wine glass, 3″x5″, acrylic on gessoed card board -SOLD-

Lastly, there’s an image of “The Peak House,” a (now demolished) farmhouse in Saratoga County that was near the home I grew up in. The image is based on a picture I took with a Pentax 35mm SLR I learned photography on as a teenager.

The Peak House, acrylic on card board, 5

The Peak House, acrylic on card board, 4″ x 8″ $20

[older]

The pieces shown here were done yesterday. While visiting with my son, I set up my easel near the park playground (Washington Park, in Albany, NY, where he usually plays). There are little color-studies of some of the stately old trees there, and a few subjects a little more whimsical.

111_4575

Washington Park tree, water color on paper. 7 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ approximate.$15

111_4576

Washington Park tree # 2, watercolor on paper. 7 1/2″ by 9 1/2″ approximate. $15

111_4577

Pencil on paper sketch of an espresso (demitasse) cup. From my sketch book. (make offer)

To see my original post about the NWPA, go here: https://elevenimages.wordpress.com/2013/10/24/the-small-works-progress-administration/

A couple more whimsical images:

111_4578

Child on bicycle, watercolor and pencil on paper, 8 1/2″ by 11″. $15

111_4579

“RAWR!” (children’s playground equipment) Washington Park, Albany NY. Watercolor on paper, 7 1/2″ by 9″ approximate. $15

If you are interested in any of the works shown there, or in any of the images following, please use the e-mail listed by clicking “about Eleven Images.”

This Week (give or take) in the Class.

I’m going to try to break up the posts to progress every couple weeks. I’m still waiting to iron out the issues surrounding HIPPA (confidentiality) and showing student work (many students are doing fine work in the class). Until then, I will continue posting in class demonstrations. If you’re seeing this post the first time, my class is the blind leading the blind. I have struggled with a mental illness for decades. I’m celebrating my thirty-sixth birthday in a couple days. (August 14th) I am happy to be alive. I am happy to be teaching students in an inpatient psychiatric hospital that art can be a way to heal yourself, to grow personally, and to keep yourself well and out of hospitals.

The pictures are what I draw as I am teaching my students.


In the past week,(6/29-7/7) I’ve continued to focus on the use of color. Here are some more of the in-class demonstrations. I have based my lessons on a book I have borrowed from the library, “Understanding Color” by Marcia Moses. I’ve been using a couple of images by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch as out in-class examples, because Munch’s use of color is so striking of an example of the use of a limited palette.

Continuing the class discussion on color theory. I have been making art my whole life, and I’m picking up what I might of missed in my informal education, from what I take out at the library. My degree is not in art, so I am learning as my students learn.

We were doing split complimentary color schemes this week (complimentary pairs, pus an adjacent color on the color wheel).

My in-class demonstrations:

111_4671

Vincent Van Gogh, “Peach Tree in Bloom” reproduction. OIl pastel on paper.

111_4672

Color study. I gave my student the prompt: “Locals say, if you go you will still find her there waiting” Oil pastel on paper.

111_4673

Oil Pastel on paper, reproduction of one of my photographs, looking south from the Rennselaer train station.

Before our discussion of color, I did a simple exercise I feel is helpful for training the eye. I began the week by bringing in a bag of dried leaves from my yard. I had intended to encourage students to develop their eye for detail. This was an exercise I found useful, early on, as I was developing my own abilities:

111_4597

Leaf, charcoal on paper.

Shifting the discussion to color, I started with a simple geometric abstract, and encouraged students to use a limited palette in their own drawing.

111_4598

Abstract, oil pastel on paper. Students were encourage to use a limited palette. My example is dominated by the complimentary colors blue and orange, and green.

The next two examples are explorations/reproductions of Munch’s work. His general color palette and strong use of color worked well to illustrate aspects of color theory for my students.

111_4600

Oil Pastel on paper, Based on Edvard Munch’s “White Night.”

111_4601

Oil pastel on paper, based on Edvard Munch’s mural at the University at Aula, “The Sun.”

Over the past week, the class focused (mostly) on using perspective. In most of the classes over the past couple weeks I have also been teaching students to mix color and have been teaching the to work in water color.

111_4559

From pictures I took as an adolescent at the Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA. Water color on paper.

(Explanation of caption under the painted image: I wanted students to think of their lives before they were ill, and the kind of person they were –or might be, if they recovered from their mental illness. I had brought in photos I took of the Grand Canyon when I was an adolescent, before I was diagnosed and before I knew I had a mental illness. I had all the students caption their image with something about themselves. My caption reads “before I was ill, I was creative and adventurous.”)

111_4560

Barn, water color on paper. From the book “The Welsh Hills of Waukeska County” by Pat Byrne

111_4561

Charcoal and Water-color on paper, reproduction of Paul Klee’s “The Conquerer”.

111_4562

Tree-lined path/road. Based on a photo from the Welsh Hills (Byrne) again).

111_4563

Original image, water color on paper. Based on the house where I currently rent, Albany, NY. Perspective lesson

111_4564

Charcoal on paper, study/review of face and facial features. My students ask that I draw and older man.

111_4566

Perspective study, based on an image by Gustave Caillebotte, (“Paris, a Rainy Day”).

111_4567

Figure study, “Officer in Riot Gear” oil pastel and charcoal on paper.

Quick Lesson, 5/14/14

So, this past week I stumbled upon a lesson idea I used in class. I thought I might share for people that teach students that may have limited or highly varied proficiency. Readers could also try this lesson on their own. Generally, I aim to create lesson ideas that challenge my students who came into my class with a set of fine art skills, but do not loose my students that may be thinking of themselves as artists for the first time. This lesson is intended for a group of adults with mixed skill levels. My students are adults hospitalized for a mental illness.

This lesson I drew inspiration from one of my favorite abstract artists, Paul Klee’s “Drawn One” (1935). See here:

 

paul-klee-drawn-one

(Image from the website, friendsofart.net)

The simplicity of the drawing was possible to recreate for less advanced students. I encouraged my students who are advancing to draw a more realistic face.

Because I am working with adults with mental illness, I entitled the exercise “Fractured Self.” Many students used the exercise to explore their own emotional state at class time. I we were working, I talked about how the choice of colors, thickness of lines, and other things may influence the emotional content of a drawing.

I had students working in charcoal (the lines) and oil pastel. I also encouraged students to limit their color pallette to three or fewer colors.

The first step was  to have each student draw a grid of irregular lines that intersect. After creating the grid of lines, students who had been in my class for some time applied what they have been learning about drawing faces, and drew a bust (head and shoulders) in the grid of lines. The last step was to color in the segments of paper created by the grid.

My students responded well to the exercise. The assignment moved quickly, but is possible in a forty-five minute class. I am still working out with my employer the consent and privacy laws under HIPPA to be able to show any student work. Each class I find it helpful to demonstrate the activity on an easel in front of the room. So, I have included two images of my in-class demonstration.

I hope this may give you some of your own ideas. If you do try this in your own classroom, or on your own, I would love to hear feed back from people.

Sample 1

Sample 1

 

Sample 2

Sample 2

Commissions Progress Page

There are few things that give me satisfaction like delivering a commissioned piece to a client or friend that requested the work. I have not updated this page so often as I should, unfortunately. I have been very fortunate to have done several commissioned works in the past year. Some are included here.

Another commissioned work, and this one I enjoyed so much. When people approach me about commissions, I am often really surprised in a happy way with the ideas people come up with. A friend, who is a practicing Zen Buddhist, wanted me to do an image in the style of Buddhist religious iconography, but using the Nintendo character, Kirby, as the central character in the image.

The final image:

img_0002

Kirby, as Buddhist Iconography, Casein Paint, Acrylic paint and graphite on a gessoed wood board. In private collection.

To prep for the final image, I did the following studies:

img_3919

Study, “the Buddha” Casein Paint on Gessoed paper.

img_3696

Kirby, study, acrylic paint on Gessoed paper.

 

img_3701

8-bit Kirby, study, acrylic paint on gessoed paper.

 

 

 

This work was a lot of fun to do. Aside that it was being purchased by a very good friend, it was a deeply personal work in many ways. Also, the client’s requests about the work meant I used painting techniques very different from how I usually paint. I definitely learned a thing or do, doing this particular work.

IMG_1283

Commissioned work, I am going to have to check with the buyer, because I forgot the title I scribbled on the back. Oil on Canvas, 18″ x 24″ in private collection

 

The next piece was also a joy to do. Sometimes, when I am approached about an idea the buyer has a very specific idea of what they want, –down to materials and the actual image. I do enjoy, though, when the direction for a commission is a little more amalgamous I have have the go-ahead to play and experiment with my typical style. This was one of those works. I had little direction other than to do something in my style, but include crows in the image.

IMG_2343

“Mother of Crows” acrylic on canvas, 16″ x 20″ NFS

On the SWPA page, I put out there I was doing commissions. A friend asked that I do one of the small works of Albany’s long-time alternative music hang-out, the Fuze Box.

The Fuze Box was a rescued Art Deco building and one-time White Tower Hamburgers location. White Tower was a Wisconsin-based competitor of White Castle, the first store opened and the company peaked in the 1950’s. Most of the original details in the building are still present: the molded glass and chrome, as well as signs advertising the buildings history before it was reused as a night-club. Long-time Albany scenesters still remember the days when the club was the QE2, and hosted live all-ages shows, as well as alternative dance nights.

So, a venerable historic structure in its own right, the Fuze Box/QE2 has been an anchor of Albany’s nightlife as long as pretty much anyone cares to recall. My friend, James, wanted an image to commemorate the Fuze Box and commissioned the work. I started doing preliminary sketches this morning.

A bit about my process: any commissioned work, or a serious work I do generally involves a few sketches. The sketching allows me to work out problems and practice the image before I start the actual work. I encourage my students to practice their ideas with sketches on paper before they truly start a piece. In this case, this is a mixed media color study and architectural study of the White Tower building (as it was in 2006, this image is from my own collection, taken with one of my many digital cameras I have owned over the years).

The sketch:

111_4117

The original image I am working from is below:

HPIM3339_2

I’ll include images, with the permission of the buyer, of the full work when it is done. If you’re interested in commissioning a work, use the contact information in the about page.

[update]

Working on an architectural drawing of a highly symmetrical Art Deco building is proving to be a challenge (not an unwelcome challenge, by any means, but still a challenge). Hopefully, I am not trying the patience of my buyer by taking my time and doing a score of preliminary sketches to get the end product right.

Last weekend, I went out with my point and shoot and took a couple night-time images to make a composite image for the final product. Today, I am working off pencil sketches of the various angles.

here’s today’s sketch (pencil on paper):

111_4222

I have permission from the buyer to include the work, which he just picked up today, on my blogs here. I did two versions of the Fuze Box image, and James, in turn, wanted both images.

So here they are drying on my easel (the source images I used are above):

111_4225
Thanks James, and I hope you enjoy the images!

Good friend and fellow odd human Seamus approached me about doing a painting for his girlfriend, Sid, who is likewise a super-cool human. What Seamus (being a Star Wars fan with a command of apocryphal and character lore I do not, sadly, have) wanted was a re-imagining of The Jabba the Hut scenes in Star Wars, with his cat, Sif, and he and his partner as characters in the piece. So, Jabba the Sif, became a thing. I drew four or five character studies, and then began painting what was one of the most fun images I have ever committed with acrylic paint to a canvas.

I have used the image with Sid’s permission.

Jabba the Sif. Acylic on canvas. Commission and birthday gift from Seamus to Sid.

Jabba the Sif. Acrylic on canvas. Commission and birthday gift from Seamus to Sid.

Thanks Seamus and Sid, I am glad you enjoy the finished piece.

Regardless of how quirky the idea, I am glad to take commisions of whatever you are looking for, and will do my best to fit materials and time within a budget you can afford. If you’re interested in a commission, use the contact in my about section on this blog.

The Class

For those that didn’t know, I have spent the last several weeks teaching an art class within the Capital District Psychiatric Center. My goal is to get funding to expand a program that makes fine art classes a part of mental health treatment both inside and outside the hospital in the city I live in: Albany, NY.

Again for those who didn’t know: this is a goal for me, because I know when I was inpatient in CDPC, art groups were important to me as a way to rebuild my life in the hard times I was having. The art groups were something I looked forward to each day when I was inpatient. As  teacher, I want to use art to help troubled people do what I did: get out of the hospital and live better lives outside of the mental health system. Mentally ill people can live full lives, hold jobs, and stay well. We can and do recover. I feel like art can help mentally ill people do that, and I am not alone in that belief.

In that spirit, I’d like to show some of the in-class demonstrations I have done. These are sketches and things I did during the class, demonstrating for my students, art techniques and skills.

It’s my hope that my students not only develop their own skill, but find ways to make art a part of thier lives once they are back living in the community –professionally, or non-professionally.

Art is important. I know from looking around my classroom, art is important to helping struggling people heal.

Some images:

111_4038

Bulletin board of my student’s work

 

[update] 5/21

This past week the class has been working with mannikins (croquis) I was able to purchase with the grant money I received. The class has really latched on to drawing with croquis. This past week, I have been encourage students to pose the croquis and talk about an incident in their lives. The class has a two-fold purpose of not only teaching art, but as an informal part of the students therapy and recover from significant mental illness (all students are currently admitted on an in-patient basis). There are two images from this (my in-class demonstrations):

croquis/figure study charcoal sketch on paper

croquis/figure study charcoal sketch on paper

 

The first sketch: a student described a family member who had overcome addiction.

 

Croquis/figure study charcoal on paper

Croquis/figure study charcoal on paper

 

The pose is meant to describe a student’s experience during a recent depressive episode.

 

[update]

Adding some new works, older sketches and works are towards the bottom of the post.

111_4228

Acrylic on paper, student prompt was to represent what “trouble” meant to them, based on a podcast from “This Modern Life”. Related to a San Francisco cafe whose proprietor struggles with Schizo-effective disorder.

111_4229

Fayette Michigan, abandoned town and now a historical site. Watercolor on paper.

111_4230

Lake Michigan, near Escanaba, Michigan. Watercolor on paper.

111_4231

Sketch, charcoal on paper. Portraits.

111_4232

Oil Pastel on paper. Prompt for this was encouraging students to depict “Safe Spaces”

[…]

111_4037

Sketching architecture, reproduction of Van Gogh’s House at Arles.

111_4036

Architectural study, perspective example. In this case a very quick study of the corner of Clinton and N. Pearl St. In-class example.

111_4035

Study, landscape, another Van Gogh reproduction.

111_4034

Study of Paul Klee’s “The Red Balloon,” from a lesson on using color and abstraction/ non-representational drawing.

111_4033

Architectural study, from the book “Hudson Valley Ruins.”

111_4032

Portrait, study. From a lesson about composition and placement of facial features.

111_4031

Studies: faces and facial features.

111_4030

Study, portraiture, faces and facial features.

111_4029

Placement of facial features and composition.

111_4028

Manet’s work “The Old Musician” has been a recurrent theme in my sketching. In this case, the “dread-locked cow-girl” is based off a figure in the Manet piece, and swaps the gender of a figure from Manet’s work.

111_4027

Study, dog

111_4026

Study, infant.

111_4024

Study, tree trunk.

First, a figure study. Study of a child playing, including an illustrated armature (left). In class demonstration.

111_4118

Reproduction, Paul Cezanne. Working on landscapes, explanation of horizon line. Oil pastel on paper.

111_4119

Mini-lesson: The Ten Minute Sketch

It wasn’t that long ago I was teaching in a classroom 40 hours a week in a subject matter that was unrelated to fine art. The simple reality for a lot of creative people is that a great deal of our days are spent doing things other than create art to pay our bills. So, with that in mind, the single greatest block on an artist’s creativity can be the simplest of stumbling blocks: “Do I have time for this?”

With this in mind I thought about ways that creative non-professionals and even professional artists can kick-start their process. I’m calling this example the “ten minute sketch.” It involves sectioning a piece of standard 8 x 11 1/2 sketch paper in your sketch book into four sections (the sections will be roughly the size of 4 x 6 note cards I was taught in high school to use to take notes for research papers).

Generally, I have encouraged my past students to “scale up” (ie: increase the size of their drawings and art) and to use a full sheet of paper for each piece. However, –this time around and in the interest of time– the idea is to create a smaller image that can be done more quickly as it will require less detail. Since this is meant for a sketch book exercise, it’s ideal for pencil or charcoal. Those who wish to may choose to work in color, but if you want to keep to the time limit (a suggestion, not a hard and fast rule by any means) you will simplify your drawing by working in one color, or with a limited palette.

Here is my example from last evening:

111_3880

My partner, Muse. Pencil on paper, 3” by 5”, from my sketch book.

Bare in mind, this is an exercise designed to help get the blood flowing. You need not agonize about small works not intended for sale. With the small size you will want to keep your details simplified.

I choose portraiture for the topic of this sketch. The planes of the face are generally simple enough to sketch in this small a size. Subjects that are more intricate and have a great deal of detail might take a great deal more time.

Whether or not you work in areas unrelated to your art, the most important key to being happy creatively is good time management. Set time aside each day to be creative. Whether your ten minute sketch is done in ten minutes or not is not important. The important piece of doing this exercise is getting over the notion of being “too busy” or, “not having time” to be creative. This is a mental trick more than anything else.

Get out there, have fun and create!

Cultivating the sketching habit (II)…

Some more recent sketches here. Many more are due because I am developing ideas for some of the small works I plan to do:

[explanation: I’ve recently become a lot more disciplined in doing regular sketches of images that I find interesting for whatever reason. When I was a kid, or a teenager, it was a natural thing to just pick up a sketch-book and treat whatever I saw. I sort of lost that habit in the business of being an adult. Now, as I am producing more lately, large complete works, it’s all the more detrimental to maintain regular practice sketching small ideas and things that I may want to turn into larger complete works.]

[note] I’ve decided to begin loading new works towards the top of the page, so it’s easier for readers to see new works, rather than scrolling past ones they may have already seen to see the newest pieces.

I am currently teaching an art therapy group three times a week, and looking for opportunities to do similar work elsewhere. Sharing my sketchbook in this way might seem a bit odd, since most artists tend to pretty jealously guard theirs. However, it’s become an important part of my pedagogy to encourage students to pay attention to their pre-drawing process. Many of these sketches are basic and rough ideas. Sketches are supposed to be where you problem-solve, they are supposed to be flawed and have problems. That’s the point. Ideas (should they make it to a final work and be hung in a gallery) do not arise fully-formed and perfect. They have a life before that. They start off malformed and imperfectly executed, –and many ideas wither on the vine and die. Being honest about that part of the process has become an important way to make creating art less intimidating for my students.

 

Some recent sketches:

7/9, I always encourage my students to pay attention to “pre-drawing.” In that spirit, this was a practice I did in the twenty minutes I was waiting for the class to start Thursday of the photograph of the train tracks looking south from the Rennselaer train station.

111_4676

Pencil on paper, train tracks, looking south from Rennselaer.

 

Two recent (from my sketchbook, 6.25.14):

First, an interior view from the cafeteria/common area in the psychiatric hospital that hosts my art class. I usually arrive at about 12:30 for a one o’clock class, and since I had no pressing business before the lesson started, I spent about 15 minutes doing this architectural study:

psychiatric hospital, sketch of interior/common area.

psychiatric hospital, sketch of interior/common area.

 

Today is one of the days I take my eight-year old son to the library. Normally, I goof around on the wi-fi, but today I opted to use the time to sketch instead. I needed a break from tech anyway. Two sketches of buildings around the Bach Library branch:

Residence, New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, USA.

Residence, New Scotland Ave, Albany, NY, USA.

 

And this is the rear of two buildings I sketched from the patio area behind the library:

Rear of buildings, near New Scotland Ave., Albany, NY, USA

Rear of buildings, near New Scotland Ave., Albany, NY, USA

Adding two today (6.13.2014)

The first was a practice in my own sketchbook of a Van Gogh piece I was using to teach a lesson in perspective. It’s frequently helpful for me to sketch on my own and work out problems before I teach anyone what I’m doing:

sketch, done right before class, pencil on paper

sketch, done right before class, pencil on paper

Second image, I was feeling in a whimsical mood this morning, so I drew Edgar. Edgar is a diminutive, plastic foam Halloween decoration that has decorated my apartments for many years.

"Edgar," charcoal on paper.

“Edgar,” charcoal on paper.

 

Again, from the book “Hudson Valley Ruins” (it’s a beautiful book, the history in it and the images are top-notch.)

111_4004

 

 

An abandoned car, from the book Hudson Valley Ruins. (above)

 

 

 

111_4007

This should be a familiar sight to people who frequently travel from Albany to NYC: The Yonkers Power Station (abandoned).

In my current class, which is a “therapeutic” fine arts group held in a hospital, I drew this sketch to the prompt I gave my students, “And then the fire went out. No one noticed.”

111_3990

Quick architectural sketch. Image from the book “Hudson River Ruins” (Ranaldi, Yasanik [sp?]) The picture is of Fedralsberg, an abandoned ruin south of Albany:

111_3988

I have also been doing some figure studies:

111_3985

figure study, pencil on paper

111_3986

figure study charcoal on paper

Another in my series of images drawing Eduard Manet’s “The Old Musician

111_3987

A reproduction of G. Klimt

111_3905

And second, Timmy of Nixon’s Spirit:

111_3906

So, I am doing a lot of sketching as pre-planning for larger works:

These are the two pieces I posted yesterday I was interested in essentially “tinting” with watercolor:

111_3771

111_3772

111_3767

Study/sketch, pencil on paper. Pollock and Klingman together near the time of the artist’s death. Photo from a NYTimes article.

111_3763

Two small sketches: above is a figure study of a Libyan opposition fighter.

111_3764

Figure study, elderly woman with a rake. Pencil on paper.

The following two images I am planning to do further work with. I will do a similar thing as I did with another small work –an image of a depression-era man selling chestnuts from a vending cart. That piece I drew in pencil, and then tinted with watercolor. I am hoping to do that over the next couple days. I will post the results once I have an opportunity to do so.

111_3765

This is a reproduction/study of Edouard Manet’s “Madame Michel-Levy.” I am starting more and more to keep Manet as among my favorites of the Impressionists.

111_3766

This is an image of a TV/entertainment mogul. I found the image in the NYTimes. For whatever reason it made me think of the song lyric scribbled next to the image.

111_3768

The last image is of a young woman, Shawna Timmonds, who was profiled in a NY Times article.

More to come, soon…

These were both in-class demonstrations (charcoal on paper):

111_3712

(Note the lines and marks made as I illustrating planning and pre-drawing techniques)

111_3715
Hope to have some more of the recent sketches out of my sketch-book soon. Here’s one of my ideas from the SWPA series…

111_3716

Sketch for the SWPA.

111_3717

In class demonstration.

111_3719

In class demonstration: placement of facial features.

111_3720

Based on a photo from the New York Times.

In class demonstrations:111_3721 111_3722
For class, sketching hands and feet.

A piece riffing off Edouard Manet’s  “The Old Musician,” it is a series I am considering for the SWPA (see for explanation here: https://elevenimages.wordpress.com/2013/10/24/the-small-works-progress-administration/)

111_3726

Here’s a couple more sketches (in color). This piece is pencil and colored pencil on paper. I was working with a student on using color in shadows:

111_3756

This piece is also a pretty good color study, this time in oil pastel:

111_3760